560 to 600 grains any difference, or go 650? - Spey Pages
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-18-2016, 12:11 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Stantonius's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 5
560 to 600 grains any difference, or go 650?

Hello everyone, right now I'm running a SA Skagit 560 head with a Rio .037 shooting line on a 8139 VT2. I like how it casts and I can get distance when my technique allows it, but I'm wondering what it would be like going up in grain weight to say a Airflo compact G2 600 head. I'm going into my second season double handing, so I'm ready to start experimenting with head weights etc. I've always liked a good load feel on my single hands, so that's sparked my interest with the heavier grains on the Spey rod. Most of the flies I use are clousers, bunny hare w/Dumbells, and large rolled muddlers, usually on t-11. So the questions I have are,

Will there be much difference in rod load going up 40 grains?

Will going up 40-100 grains effect my casting making it more difficult, or easier for me feeling more rod load?

I've read that the 8139 Vt2 shoots well with a 650 Skagit. Should I consider going that heavy?

Thanks for reading through, and any advice/tips are totally appreciated! Cheers!
Stantonius is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-18-2016, 01:09 PM
Registered User
 
fish0n4evr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: The mid-Pacific.
Posts: 4,784
If you haven't scaled your line Id recommend it so you'll know what it is that you "feel" before making comparisons. Lines can be over or under, by as much as 40 grains. When they are off they tend be heavier, not lighter and you might already be at 600. As an example I have an SA skagit 440 which is actually 462 grains.

But to your question whether 40 grains will make much difference... it can be noticeable and it can make quite a difference.

Last edited by fish0n4evr; 09-18-2016 at 03:34 PM.
fish0n4evr is offline  
post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-18-2016, 01:38 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Finland
Posts: 1,919
In that case 40gr is 7% more and when fly line weight has only partial share of the rod bend its effect is less but you should be able to feel it.

PVC lines can absorb water at least 5%!

Esa
bender is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-18-2016, 02:22 PM
Registered User
 
aviomech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Snohomish, Skykomish, Snoqualmie Rivers
Posts: 370
Quote:
Originally Posted by fish0n4evr View Post
If you haven't scaled your line Id recommend it so you'll know what it is that you "feel" before making comparisons. Lines can be over or under by as much as 40 grains. When they are off they tend be heavier, not lighter and you might already be at 600. As an example I have an SA skagit 440 which is actually 462 grains.

But to your question whether 40 grains will make much difference... it can be noticeable and it can make quite a difference.
I agree. SA seems to be 20gr over on all their lines. I have a SA Skagit 540gr that actually weighs over 560gr, and also a 440gr that weighs 460gr. Even my Airflos are on the heavy side.

If the line ends up weighing 580-600gr, I would try the 650gr. If it is truly @ 560gr, then I would go to the 600gr. What ever shop you go to, ask them to weigh the line before you buy it. Most good fly shops will.

"Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts." - Winston Churchill
aviomech is offline  
post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-18-2016, 04:11 PM
Registered User
 
fish0n4evr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: The mid-Pacific.
Posts: 4,784
Just to clarify that skagit head is only 22 grains off. I do & have had other lines that are 30 and 40 grains off. Maybe a mislabeled - yet other lines that are dead-on, Rio lines that are dead-on, some Airflo Deltas 7 GPS lines are right there as advertised. I don't think it's should be a deal breaker - I'd imagine it's difficult for manufacturers to hit it just right - but when deciding on one or the next I think its important to know where you are to begin with.
fish0n4evr is offline  
post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-18-2016, 05:19 PM
Registered User
 
BNF861's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: BC, Canada
Posts: 181
A few years ago I had the same rod in a 7wt (VT2 7130). I used to use a Rio 550 skagit on it and when I tried a 575 I liked it even more (advertised weights, I never weighed them). Being that yours is a weight higher it would be worth trying a 600 or 630 I would think.
BNF861 is offline  
post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-18-2016, 11:36 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Stantonius's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 5
Thanks guys for the quick replies. Weighing my current SA head and any other head I intend to purchase is a great idea. That would give me a solid comparison. I had no idea that heads had that much variance in weight right from the manufacturer. Ill see what the local shops can do for a weigh in. Worst case scenario I remember seeing a food scale at my moms years ago.. Maybe it's still kicking around

Thanks again! S.
Stantonius is offline  
post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-19-2016, 12:25 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: north. Washington/south British Columbia
Posts: 1,484
Send a message via Yahoo to Nooksack Mac
I've been trying various lines on the same rod recently. The good fits are:

a Rio Skagit iFlight 575 grain head with a 13' 102 grain sink tip;
a Rio Skagit Flight 550 grain head with a 13' 86 grain sink tip;
a S. A. Evolution 600 grain;
a Beulah 7/8 71 foot, 594 grain floating line;
a Rio 555 grain 7/8 Unispey with a 52 foot head, including a 20 foot floating head.
Nooksack Mac is offline  
post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-20-2016, 04:41 PM
Registered User
 
Chas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: The River I am fishing on.
Posts: 314
One has to think it all rests in the hands of the user, stroke, rod used, and most importantly feel of the line loading the rod. Face it, fishing is not all about the length of cast its about reading the water and covering that location with the least amount of effort. I have found over the years that the recommended line weight is only a suggestion, starting point for fitting the line to the rod based on your preference.

"it's all about the hunt"
Chas is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Spey Pages forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Linear Mode Linear Mode
Rate This Thread:



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Does 30 grains in 600'make an appreciable difference in a Skagit line ? JJofCBL Spey Basics 9 08-08-2016 05:10 PM
WTB: Hardy Mach 55 ~ 650 grains kova1385 Spey Classifieds 0 02-16-2016 09:51 PM
skagit iflights 600 650 misterflyguy Spey Classifieds 2 10-02-2015 04:58 PM
Does 30 grains really make a difference? 5shot Tackle 29 03-30-2015 03:19 PM
WTB:600 - 650 gr compact head surfnfish Spey Classifieds 0 09-08-2012 11:51 AM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome