rod length verses wt? - Spey Pages
 
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 02-12-2007, 02:13 PM Thread Starter
 
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rod length verses wt?

What deference would I feel casting 11' 7wt. verses a 13' 7wt,? or casting a 11' 7wt. verses a 11' 10wt.. steve
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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 02-12-2007, 03:12 PM
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It's just a feeling...

you would really need to get out & try the different set-ups, as what feels just 'good' or 'OK' for some may be 'magic' for others.

It's not just the rod, but the rod/line combo, and what you are asking of that combo...ie. cast 60' with delicate presntation for stream trout, or with to boom out 100'+ with sinking tips and heavy flies.

Experiment a bit!

Mike

If people concentrated on the really important things in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing poles (spey rods). Doug Larson

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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 02-12-2007, 03:16 PM
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I'd add one thing ... the length of the rod adds to physical (casting) fatigue over the length of a days fishing; as would the extra weight of the longer rod.



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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 02-12-2007, 04:10 PM
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Fred,

While in most cases I would agree with you, if I can play devils advocate just a bit. I believe that Mike is right and it is what you are asking of the set-up that also impacts fatigue over the course of the day. For sime applications, a longer rod actually will reduce fatigue.

A case study to demonstrate my point. Two rivers with similar sized fish and requiring the same presentation and flies. In this case, floating line with damp or dry flies.

River A: 60-70' wide with average cast being 60' (including presentation angle) I fish this river quite a bit in late summer months and usually fish it with a 12' 6 weight. This rod will easily cover the lies and is light in the hand. Fishing an entire day is no problem. For this river, a 14-16' rod would be overkill and the extra length would likely result in some degree of increased fatigue.

River B: 200 - 300' wide. Of course most lies are within 70-80' but a fair number are closer to 100' out. This used to be my home river and although the fish are the same size as River A and the flies are the same, where they lie are not. In this case, long casts (80'+) are more the norm. For this river, I have used a 15' 8 weight and a 15'2" 7/8 as my chief tools. I could of course use my 12' #6 and cover many of the lies but the extra effort in doing so would tire me out more that the use of the longer rod.

I would also say that backcast room being constant, if deeper wading is required, the longer rod results in less fatigue.

'tip

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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 02-13-2007, 03:20 PM
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I am a relative newbie to spey casting. This year I picked up a lighter, shorter spey rod for summer fishing. For a newbie with less perfect casting skills I found the shorter rod less forgiving of mistakes related to line pick up and setting up my cast. I chose the rod more for the way the rod would feel during a fight and ease of use when adding stripping action. To me, the fight with a big spey rod feels pretty foreign. My new spey rod is much more like a single handed rod feel. I was also thinking that a smaller spey rod made sense in summer where big distances were not critical and a smaller rod may make casting in tight positions easier. I do feel a big difference between a 12 1/2 foot rod and a 14 foot rod.

Now for a little ribbing , have we all become a bunch of wussies? Modern 14-15 foot rods are so darn light on a relative basis, should fatigue really be a parameter? Hell, what if we were talking about covering the same water with a single handed rod? What if we were true traditionalists using wood rods? We should all marvel at the exceptional tools we have today.

Joe Smolt.
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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 02-13-2007, 03:41 PM
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Sage...

Yes, 15' Sage #10 wt, weighs in @ 8.75oz. Very light on the hand/arm, but a little less light on the pocket!

M

If people concentrated on the really important things in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing poles (spey rods). Doug Larson

Take only photographs, retain only memories, leave only a good impression of yourself, perhaps just footprints.

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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 02-14-2007, 03:20 PM
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15' Sage #10 wt, weighs in @ 8.75oz.

8.75oz for 15 wt.10 is an amazingly low weight. The question is does the rod really weight so little.
I have seen so many rods which weigh was 1/2 to 1 oz higher then marked on the rod.
For example Scott LS2 13 wt.7 weights 1 oz more, but most of its weight is located in the butt section so it feels very light.
Burkhaimer, CND, Mesier, do report the real physical weight. Could be that their balance, action, the way rods fish/mend and durability are the key selling tickets. And those rods are very light in hand too.
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 02-14-2007, 03:59 PM
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Correction...

...sage graphite III GFL 10150-3 #10 line 15'0" 8 7/8oz (not 8.75 oz).

That's what on this traditional salmon stick.

However, although I have not actually weighed the rod, it is very light in the hand, and when fishing. Super balance with Danielsson 11/14. The rod action over 2 days use persuaded me to buy the rod from a fishing buddy, and with a new tiptop ring, I'm sure it will serve me as well as it did it's previous owner.

Mike

If people concentrated on the really important things in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing poles (spey rods). Doug Larson

Take only photographs, retain only memories, leave only a good impression of yourself, perhaps just footprints.

Your lines, your rivers, your way!
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