Any Spey Instructors In So. New England? - Spey Pages
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 4 votes, 5.00 average. Display Modes
post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-15-2004, 08:38 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 201
Send a message via Yahoo to 2HandTheSalt
Any Spey Instructors In So. New England?

Been trying to find one for a long time. Anyone know of any?

Thanks.

Jay Horton
2HandTheSalt is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-15-2004, 09:59 PM
Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
 
juro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Steelhead country|striper coast|bonefish belt
Posts: 1,771
Nope

Jay,

The very best course of action is of course take lessons with the very best - the Hunter's class with Simon himself next year in Concord NH.

Next best would be to spend a couple hundred bucks to fly out to Seattle or Portland, and spend a week spey casting and fishing for summer run steelhead with the Speypages gang. I am sure we could get a $5 bet going to see who teaches you how to spey cast successfully and a bunch of members would take that bet. You will come back a true spey disciple and understand much more than the casting - you would apply the full gamut of spey fishing in waters where it has most meaning in the US, and might come back addicted to real steelheading too.

As you know I just passed my FFF cert and would be happy to go thru my current class agenda with you (recently revised). If you are interested send me a PM, or maybe we can get Josko at home between world travels to join in as he was interested recently. He has viewed the Derek Brown and Rio International Spey Casting videos as an intro already.

Other than yours truly I have heard that Jim Rusher (former owner Whitakers in Pulaski, Orvis affiliation) does a class in Maine. I've seen the video footage put up on the web by the shop that he does the class through his technique differs quite a bit from that which I have learned over the years in the PNW but you'll get unique perspectives from meeting different instructors. I have yet to meet him in person but he is quite well known and seems to be a very effective speaker.

Also, you'd do well to talk to my good friend Topher Browne, LL Bean school and salmon fishing expert from the Portland area. He is not only an excellent instructor, he is a great practitioner of the art of angling. In fact I recommend him highly.

If you are planning on applying spey to coastal angling, I think it's an interesting application but not without it's problems IMHO. I'd be curious to hear your opinions on the following perspectives:

The typical Spey line is a floating belly line with more length than most would like to strip. If you leave the head out you lose the last 50 feet of the retrieve. If you strip it in, you have to work 50 feet of fat line back out. If you are fishing dry on the swing with a floater in current and a schoolie fly, no problem. As you move to higher density lines and bigger flies, the overhead cast is superior for the task.

Sinking lines are hard to lift and set up and tough to anchor lightly. The big flies are prone to creating problems with anchoring especially when combined with said sinking lines.

The one spey method that would apply best to coastal striper fishing is Skagit casting, a method that uses shorter denser heads and increased water tension to throw bigger flies. My experiences have been that the surface turbulence common to coastal waters interferes with smooth skagit casting technique and I find myself again resorting to overhead in the surf and shore.

We are typically not restricted with backcasting space although the situation does arise occasionally on the coast (retaining walls, high beach bluffs, etc). IMHO most of the problems that are encountered on the coast are easily overcome with a shooting head or just making a simple switch cast (forward spey) in extremely tight quarters.

Overhanding with two-handers is another story, as you of all people know. If you are interested in spey casting regardless, then that's a fantastic reason to take lessons. I just thought it would be fair to share my findings having spent a lot of time trying to apply spey fishing to coastal waters without much pleasure.

I look forward to hearing your perspectives on the above, and let me know offline if you want to schedule a lesson. It would be on a river or pond.

Juro
juro is offline  
post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-15-2004, 10:41 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Portland, ME.
Posts: 76
I have seen Topher Brown at a couple of clinics, and he is very good. Juro is too.

One cast can change your day...maybe your life.
Eddie is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-16-2004, 09:05 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 201
Send a message via Yahoo to 2HandTheSalt
Juro, both Josko and myself would very much like to set up a series of lessons. Let's get this going! If scheduling does not permit this Summer, Fall is just around the corner....

I want to learn it for two reasons: One, becasuse it is just such a beautiful thing to be able to do. I spent a good deal of time this past winter standing in the frigid water at Highbank hacking away at it, maybe hitting one good cast in twenty, but that one was enough to keep me going. I am convinced that you can not be a complete fly fisher without knowing how to spey cast. The practical applications for this area are less important to me.

The second reason is that I am convinced that over time a whole new hybrid form of coastal fly fishing wilth two-handed rods will develop that will combines overhead, spey and underhand techniques. For instance, using a snap, or even the first half of a double spey to reposition the fly to then pick up into a normal back cast and delivering an overhead cast after the current has dragged your fly parallel to the beach. Or picture yourself standing on the beach at the lighthouse with strong outgoing current, fishing a long intermediate head. You retrieve the head just inside the tip, single spey 25-degrees up-current, but instead of delivering on the forward cast, you shoot the rest of the head into a back-cast then deliver your forward overhead cast. ( You probably do stuff like this all the time without even thinking about it.)

Watching Simon on the beach only reinforced this idea in my head.

I do not believe there is a big potential for pure spey fishing with long floating heads, but there may be plenty of opportunities to utilize these techniques in ways we haven't even thought of yet.
2HandTheSalt is offline  
post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-16-2004, 09:28 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: pennsylvania
Posts: 24
I'd be interested in something this Fall on the East Coast. Running an apple orchard doesn't allow me to get away for very long from Sept. 1 until late Nov. but two or three days in a row is possible if I get a week or so of advance notice. I'm new to spey casting. Won a 14' Orvis two hander w/ Loop 3W and three Hardy lines last year but, based on the advice of others, have not used the set up since I didn't want to develop bad habits which would be hard to break later. Have been flyfishing for trout/salmon for 30 years so am familiar w/ single hand rods up to 10 feet but must admit the 14 footer and spey casting that I've observed in videos has been somewhat mysterious/intimidating. Keep me in the loop. Thanks.
rockrock is offline  
post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-16-2004, 09:54 AM
Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
 
juro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Steelhead country|striper coast|bonefish belt
Posts: 1,771
Jay,

Reading your post you definitely have a good handle on how spey casting fits into the coastal scene, and appreciate it for what it is no matter the application. My class materials are focused on 'orthodox' spey but the application of spey techniques to the situations you described is very real and I do in fact use them all the time even with single handed rods. In fact the percentage of flats shots I take using spey casts instead of false casting is increasing every outing and virtually all second shots are setup using a snake, switch, or double depending on current and wind. I use spey casts against bluffs and walls and the method extends my ability to catch fish in difficult spots. I will include adapted coastal techniques like the ones we discussed with Simon (aerial snake, etc) as well as some flats applications I've found very handy.

I am sure I can communicate the fundamentals to you and Josko, and am equally sure these will lead to your applying some ingenuity in how they are applied in our waters. The class will be first and foremost traditional spey and of course I enjoy very much applying them to our striper fishery as well.

Watching Simon casting during his recent visit to Cape Cod was like having cataract surgery and suddenly seeing again. Seeing what a two-handed rod is capable of with tournament casting mechanics was a revelation. It inspired a whole new regimen of overhead casting practice for me, and of course his spey casting and instruction is without peer.

If this works I can meet up with you at 4:30 pm for a first intro session tomorrow after the Big Brother event, otherwise it will be a few days before I can get back on cape. SW 15-20 so we should go to a wadeable pond for the basics. I will bring a few rods and spey lines and my first session handouts to the cottage just in case.
juro is offline  
post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-16-2004, 10:03 AM
Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
 
juro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Steelhead country|striper coast|bonefish belt
Posts: 1,771
Quote:
Originally Posted by rockrock
I'd be interested in something this Fall on the East Coast. Running an apple orchard doesn't allow me to get away for very long from Sept. 1 until late Nov. but two or three days in a row is possible if I get a week or so of advance notice. I'm new to spey casting. Won a 14' Orvis two hander w/ Loop 3W and three Hardy lines last year but, based on the advice of others, have not used the set up since I didn't want to develop bad habits which would be hard to break later. Have been flyfishing for trout/salmon for 30 years so am familiar w/ single hand rods up to 10 feet but must admit the 14 footer and spey casting that I've observed in videos has been somewhat mysterious/intimidating. Keep me in the loop. Thanks.
rockrock-

You have a PA neighbor, grizz0707 (Charles Hudak) who is a spey enthusiast, single malt guru, and overall cool spey dude. I hope we can work something out and I will keep you informed of any developments claves etc.
juro is offline  
post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-16-2004, 04:28 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: pennsylvania
Posts: 24
Juro, thanks for info on griz0707. I'll touch base w/ him.
rockrock is offline  
post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-16-2004, 05:45 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 201
Send a message via Yahoo to 2HandTheSalt
Can't make it tomorrow, but with a little more notice, maybe next time.

Thanks, Juro.

Jay
2HandTheSalt is offline  
post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-16-2004, 08:02 PM
Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
 
juro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Steelhead country|striper coast|bonefish belt
Posts: 1,771
I will drop you a line and propose some dates, thanks.
juro is offline  
post #11 of 13 (permalink) Old 07-28-2004, 10:12 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: New England
Posts: 1,447
I would also be interested in any spey casting instructions/classes/gatherings in New England.

I live in NW Connecticut and attended the 3 day Hunter's class with Simon and Jim Vincent about 5 years ago.

I could find two or three additional interested students as well.

[email protected] (remove 8888 for e-mail)

Regards,
Fred
FKrow is offline  
post #12 of 13 (permalink) Old 08-12-2004, 12:07 AM
Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
 
juro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Steelhead country|striper coast|bonefish belt
Posts: 1,771
Fred -

Thanks for the inquiry! I'll contact you offline with details. I am teaching a private lesson on the Quinebaug River in Putnam CT (NE corner near Webster MA) and will let you know what I think of the river for a small group lesson. However if you have another location in mind closer to you, please let me know.

THANKS!
juro is offline  
post #13 of 13 (permalink) Old 08-13-2004, 08:42 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: pennsylvania
Posts: 24
Juro, keep me posted on classes in New England. My wife's family are all Yankees from MA and CT so we look for any excuse to travel to that area. Thanks in advance.
rockrock is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Spey Pages forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Linear Mode Linear Mode
Rate This Thread:



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Defining the Spey.... SpeyFitter General 15 02-07-2006 10:33 PM
Ad Revenues etc on the Spey Clave, or "How to go Broke in Hurry on the Internet." Dana General 19 12-05-2004 05:32 PM
2003 Sandy River Spey Clave Video For Sale! Mark Bachmann General 3 10-28-2003 12:03 PM
spey instructors clave Dana Instructors 2 03-19-2003 10:39 PM
Spey Casting Instructors A490-F Technique 12 02-09-2002 11:13 PM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome