snake roll - Spey Pages
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
post #1 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-23-2000, 03:49 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: DanaDate: 6/22/2000 10:49 PM
How many members are actively using this cast, and in which situations? Do you find that you favour the snake over the double spey, or are there situations where the double spey is preferable?
ISC Archives is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-23-2000, 05:24 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: BrianDate: 6/23/2000 12:24 AM

I love the Reverse Snake Roll when there's a downstream breeze.  Single Speys and Snap T's get blown into one's right ear, but the Reverse Snake sends the cast out with little danger to the caster. 

 

ISC Archives is offline  
post #3 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-27-2000, 11:11 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: J_DDate: 6/27/2000 6:11 PM

Well first of all, understand that I live in the land of no rivers (L.A.) so I don't get to log in near as much river time as most of the guys on the board.

Brian mentions using a "reverse" snake roll in preferance to a single spey or a snap T. I am assuming river left, right handed caster, wind blowing downstream.  Is that correct Brian? Is "reverse" refering to an across the body cast?

The snap-T is just another way of setting up for what could be done as a single spey cast. In this case disaster. He must make the cast from his left side or he is going to get hit in the back of the head because the wind is going to blow the loop into his bod.

He could do a left handed double spey, or the equivilent across the body cast. Either way you do it, two casting motions are required. The snake roll, being one continuous motion, is much easier to pull off, especially across the body.

I would do the same. Across the body snake roll.

ISC Archives is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-27-2000, 11:51 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: kushDate: 6/27/2000 6:51 PM
Are
ISC Archives is offline  
post #5 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-28-2000, 12:10 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: kushDate: 6/27/2000 7:10 PM
Are there situations where I prefer the snake roll? Maybe more like are there situations where I DON'T prefer it! Personally, I will use the reverse (across the body) snake roll rather than a single spey. The advantages I find over the single spey are for one the timing is less critical than the single spey and it allows me to present my cast on virtually any angle acrooss-stream. Furthermore, as the snake roll from any side is by FAR my best cast I am very comfortable with it. As for advantages over the double spey - I don't remember the last time I used a double spey! The snake roll is more compact - basically one motion, much more dynamic, in fact the size of the D-loop and energy in it make the double spey an antique cast. The only times that a snake roll is not adviseable is of course during moderate to strong upstream winds in which case I go to either snap-T's or single speys (cross body or otherwise).
The snake roll is unquestionably my everyday fishing cast, it is accurate, powerful and compact. I heartily recommend that speycasters take the time to add it to their arsenals.

Tight lines - tyler
ISC Archives is offline  
post #6 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-28-2000, 04:28 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: BrianDate: 6/27/2000 11:28 PM

As Tyler mentioned, it is an across-the-body cast.  And yes, you guessed correctly, upstream wind, right-handed caster, water flowing right-to-left. 

 

ISC Archives is offline  
post #7 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-28-2000, 11:10 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: StlhdrDate: 6/28/2000 6:10 AM

I found that the snake roll was an easier cast to learn and execute, and I use this cast over the dbl spey.  I did not like the dbl spey because of the additional motions that are required and also the water disturbance it causes.  I also found that sink tips are easier to cast with the snake roll than with the dbl spey.

 

 

ISC Archives is offline  
post #8 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-29-2000, 12:01 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: SinktipDate: 6/28/2000 7:01 PM
I
ISC Archives is offline  
post #9 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-29-2000, 12:05 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: SinktipDate: 6/28/2000 7:05 PM
I can testify to Tyler's mastery of this cast. I have yet to try and learn it but after impaling my new breathables with a 1/0 hook this past spring on the Sauk, I plan on hitting either Brian or Tyler up for some instruction. I was making a snap-t with a downstream wind and river right to left.

I love the snap-t and feel comfortable with the doublespey but the off-hand double has never been a good cast for me.
ISC Archives is offline  
post #10 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-29-2000, 10:40 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: Fred EvansDate: 6/29/2000 5:40 AM

Ok, I'll 'bite.' We who live in the 'back waters' of Southern Oregon just use Spey Rod (in all truth I've only seen two other fellows with them in the past 5 years and one was a writer for a Japaneese (sp?) 'Field and Stream' type magazine) on the Rogue what to know What the heck is a Snake cast? Will someone describe how it's executed; can guess why, but not 'how' for the discussion.

Fred

ISC Archives is offline  
post #11 of 21 (permalink) Old 06-29-2000, 11:02 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: DanaDate: 6/29/2000 6:02 AM

I'm hoping to add a short video file of Kush (resident master of the cast) executing a snake roll sometime in the near future (I just have to get him and my DV out on a river!), but here is a poor description:

River right, fly on the dangle, angler facing the river for a right-handed cast. The rod is lifted from the water's surface and executes a figure "9" (looking downriver) in one smooth motion, with the loop of the 9 more elliptical in shape than the 9 on your keyboard (or in this message!). As the rod tip rounds the front of the loop the real effort of the cast begins as the rod is swept back and up into the 1 o'clock position (Simon Gawesworth--who invented the cast--describes this as "trying to flip over an egg"). This motion causes the line to "jump" from downriver to a point just out and downstream from the caster.  The caster hesitates with the rod in the ready position until the leader and the first few feet of the line have touched down or "anchored", then the standard forward cast is made.

Of course, this is an oversimplification of the cast, and it's better to see it than have it described (hence the forthcoming DV clip), and there are about a billion things that can go wrong from the moment of the inital lift until the final forward cast is made, but I hope this provides a basic description. If the above doesn't make any sense, please tell me and I'll try again!

Dana

ISC Archives is offline  
post #12 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-06-2000, 04:21 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: Fred EvansDate: 7/6/2000 11:21 AM
Thanks for the info; will (sans fly) give this a try.FE
ISC Archives is offline  
post #13 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-06-2000, 10:47 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: J_DDate: 7/6/2000 5:47 PM

I would like to add a few lines to Dana's description of the snake roll cast. Again right handed caster, river flowing left to right and the fly on the dangle.

Start the figure 9 from the bottom of the 9, bringing the rod tip back and up and over the top and around again in a counter clockwise motion,. If you accelerate the stroke at the right time, you can drive the fly, leader and line tip into the water while forming the "D" loop. Think of the "D" loop looking more like the small  rather pointed end of an egg. So as you come around the the figure 9 to about the 8 or 7 oclock position, accelerate to about 2 oclock position to form the loop, slight pause, and then cast.

Like Dana said, better to see it done. The written word is a liittle lacking here. Jim Vincent's International Spey Casting video features Simon Gawsworth performing this cast. Good, but the details are not that clearly shown.

JD

ISC Archives is offline  
post #14 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-08-2000, 02:44 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: pentaDate: 7/7/2000 9:44 PM
And now a question from the deep NE.What's a snap-t cast ?While I'm here ,anyone else using a diamondback
Spey rod ???
Cheers and TIA Brian
ISC Archives is offline  
post #15 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-08-2000, 02:55 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: BrianDate: 7/7/2000 9:55 PM

Hi Brian,

You can find a good description of the Snap-T included in this article.

It's a very useful cast.

good luck,

Brian Lencho

Seattle, WA

 

http://www.flyshop.com/centers/northwest/8-98snake/tunnel.html

ISC Archives is offline  
 

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Spey Pages forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Linear Mode Linear Mode
Rate This Thread:



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome