"Center-Pin" reels: what are they? - Spey Pages
 
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 12-13-2001, 01:25 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: Fred EvansDate: 12/13/2001 10:25 AM
Was putting about some web-sites and came accross several references to "center-pin" reels. Lots of folks want to sell them, but darned little info on what they are/how they're fished.
 
I'm sure they're not a 'fly reel' by the photos on the web pages, but anyone used them?
Fred
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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 12-13-2001, 04:56 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: CarlDate: 12/13/2001 1:56 PM
Centerpin reels are for float fishing, used with long rods and mono.  They are very smooth and have no drag--freespool in both directions.  This lets the angler feed line into the drift very easily.  All "drag" is by palming, but as we know in the spey world, the long rod makes the reel less critical in the fight than with a short rod.  The centerpin reels are expensive because of the machining/smoothness needed.  It is another specialty form of fishing, to be sure.  Casting with those reels is different too, but that's more detail than needed here.
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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 12-13-2001, 07:56 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: cootDate: 12/13/2001 4:56 PM

Hi Fred: The centerpin reel is the Englishmans answer to the French
spinning reel.
Carl has covered the matter very well I can only add that they are even
more difficult to learn to cast than a flycast.While in north america they
have been widely used for float fishing they can cast virtually any type of
bait or lure with or without a float . One of the advantages of the
centerpin is that it can be used with almost any flyrod of 6 wt and up
although the longer rods of 11 to 14 feet maximize its casting and fishing
abilities.
It allows the man who is primarily a flyfisherman to quickly convert over
to baitcasting without the need for an additional rod,when the nature of
the water dictates.
Bud Smithers
Kelowna BC

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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 12-13-2001, 08:24 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: Rod FlexDate: 12/13/2001 5:24 PM
Bud, I think you've been known to swing a spoon off the end of your spey rod using a Silex. I'ts a lethal method for big springs when you can't get a fly to them. I fished the Skenna last year using a Silex and brass spoon. I hooked several large springs when nothing else would work. I have been considering the use of a small French spinner blade ahead of my tube flies for winter steelhead and springs. Has anyone on the board used this method with success. It seems like a nice compromise when conditions rule out throwing a fly at them.
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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 12-13-2001, 10:43 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: cootDate: 12/13/2001 7:43 PM

Hi Rodflex: I must plead guilty to on occasion flinging spoons from a
spey rod with silex however I havent found good solution for spinners with
tube flies. I suggest you might try using a spin and glow ahead of the tube
fly or alternatively mounting the spin and glow on a short plastic tube and
adding it ahead of the fly.If you are able to use triples I would try a
grub style salmon fly on a tube with the spin and glow.
The old fashioned Devon minnow was also an excellent solution but I havent
found a good source of these .
The fly and small ivory blade spinner was a very common method 50 years
ago and certainly worked well .It was light enough to be cast from a
sinking fly line.
I believe it would still work well with streamer flies like the Mickey
Finn or one of the Ghost streamers. If I were selecting a spinner for this
purpose I would go to a size 0 or even a 00 in brass on light stainless
wire of .025 diam . You wont need any body weight for a flyline but you can
use either a small coil spring ,or a long bead to close the wire loop
through your flies. This way you will be able to use the same spinner with
a variety of flies.
I dont know what the drill is for putting pic attachments on this list but
I`ll attach one which maybe they will post to you.
Bud Smithers
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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 12-14-2001, 12:48 AM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: Rod FlexDate: 12/13/2001 9:48 PM
Bud, I'm in BC so singles are the only option. I remember my father fishing salmon, in Ireland, with a small 00 size spinner blade ahead of the fly. I think the average spey rod could handle this without too much effort. Springs  come to a spinner really well, particularly in moderately deep water where it's hard to get their attention. Your idea of using a small spin n' glow has merit--I must give it a shot.
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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-12-2002, 11:43 AM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: Steven MDate: 1/12/2002 8:43 AM
Hi Fred,
 
I'm not surprised that people want to sell them: more emphasis on fly fishing today and I doubt that many people know how to cast them.
 
These reels were generally used with an 'Avon' type rod, which had a through action.  Usually used on narrow runs, with float tackle, and one used this tackle to cover long runs with one cast - by 'trotting' - allowing the bait to be carried downstream in the current. The line is recovered quickly by 'batting' - using the four fingers of the line hand in an inward movement under the reel drum.
 
Casting: line is pulled out with the four finger of the line hand - a loop between rod rings and is released as the rod completes a sweeping action out towards the river. The cheapest one available used to be one (in 1995) made by Leeda in the UK - sold for under £50.
 
Regards
Steven M 
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 01-13-2002, 04:58 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: Fred EvansDate: 1/13/2002 1:58 PM
Steve thanks for the how-to info. Appears very similar (with added attractions) of how I run my Tallon float rod with a light bait casting reel. (MY GOD .... he just admitted he, he, he... Oh the horror of it all ...uses 'something' beyond spey rods.  ) Actually a fun way of taking a brake from the long rods. The Tallon's 12' and light as a feather. With a light float and flys below, a very, very productive way of fishing some of the drifts here on the upper Rogue.
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