Bamboo Spey Rods?? - Spey Pages
 
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post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-24-2002, 04:26 AM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: EugeneDate: 1/24/2002 1:26 AM
Anyone ever used one of these? Made one? Since I have absolutely no free time I thought I'd take on a project for those rainy evenings. Any info would be appriciated.
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post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-24-2002, 05:07 AM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: DNLDate: 1/24/2002 2:07 AM
I have a Hardy from the 60's that I use occasionally. Its a 12' for a #8 - quite manageable and fun to fish with. Bob Clay up on the Kispiox is making bamboo double hand rods and fishes them most of the time.
May the fish make you smile!
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post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-24-2002, 10:54 AM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: Steven MDate: 1/24/2002 7:54 AM
Hi Eugene,
 
Have never made one, but traded in a 16' graphite rod a couple of years ago and bought a 14' spliced Sharpes split cane rod. Has the designation #10 - so must be from the early 1960's.  I fish this as a " Sunday" rod, and whilst it is fun to land fish on  (nothing bigger than 3 kgs so far), the real challenge is casting the thing - remembering to keep the bottom hand passive. It's quite a weight, but I find that the loops are better if one uses the two finger and thumb grip - too strong a grip on the rod and one can easily produce loops that are as open as the rod is long!
 
The next thing to find is a greenheart salmon rod. Seldom see these advertised.
 
Steven M
Ps. Given the chat about big rods, it was interesting to note that the 16' graphite rod is still for sale 1.5 years later. It isn't a bad rod either - attested to by a caster / instructor sometimes mentioned on these pages, but reflects the relative (as I understand it from retailers) lack of interest in the UK these days for rods that are much over 15'.
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post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-25-2002, 01:42 AM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: inlandDate: 1/24/2002 10:42 PM
Eugene,

I have a brand new cane rod that will see its first action for summer runs sometime in May. This rod is 12' rated for a 6/7 line and weighs just under 12 ounces. I agree with Steven, you have to hold the rod different and adjust your timing accordingly. Tip speeds are really slow!!! I will shortly have a rod from Bob Clay, his 13' #8 that will be my working rod for summer fishing.

I have been in conversation with the guys at Clanrods of Scotland about getting a brand new 15' Greenheart built, it will all depend on the cost.

William

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post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-26-2002, 07:16 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: JohnDate: 1/26/2002 4:16 PM
I was curious about greenheart so did a search.  Found out that the grenheart tree is a member of the laurel family, and the wood, when dry, has a modulus of elasticity of 3,700.  this compares with 35,000 to 80,000 for carbon fiber.  Must be a pretty slow rod.
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post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-26-2002, 09:46 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: mjpDate: 1/26/2002 6:46 PM
If any of you folks are interested, I have a 12' split cane spey which I would be willing to sell or swap.
 
Make me an offer I won't  refuse.
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post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-27-2002, 05:46 AM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: J_DDate: 1/27/2002 2:46 AM
john,
 
where did you find the info, especially the modulus of elasticity figures for greenheart?
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post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-27-2002, 07:19 AM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: JohnDate: 1/27/2002 4:19 AM
the site is for Durable Wood Products USA, INC,, or similar to this.  Just got it through a search engine.  the following whould get you there.
 
 
John
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post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-27-2002, 01:54 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: Steven MDate: 1/27/2002 10:54 AM
Hi William / DNL,
 
What type of line do you use on your bamboo rods? Have you ever thought of a silk line?
 
Steven M
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post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-27-2002, 07:39 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: HansDate: 1/27/2002 4:39 PM
Hi,
I own a Hardy Palkona, made back in the 60's, and it casts great, only one neds a lot of muscles to cast it a whole day long. So what I do, I fish with my Sage, and just for the fun I will take out the Hardy. It has a very slow, traditional action. Alas, never hooked a fish on it, the Atl. Salmon seem to like the taste of the Sage better...
Greetings from The Netherlands, Hans.
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post #11 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-28-2002, 04:11 AM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: Fred EvansDate: 1/28/2002 1:11 AM
For the fun of it I punched in 'silk fly lines' into Google a few days back and came up with at least two UK companies that manufacture/sell this type of line. But Lordie Alive are they expensive! One I remember was $170.
fe
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post #12 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-28-2002, 10:15 AM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: inlandDate: 1/28/2002 7:15 AM
Steven M,

I have taken to throwing silk on the cane rod. Been trying to come up with a weight forward style of line that would allow a fair amount of line to be shot, but so far have not found the right combination of cutting and splicing the Thebault WF salmon lines.

With the tip speed being so slow, I find it difficult to shoot much line. Have tried Rio midspey 6/7, Accelerator 7/8, WC 6/7/8 and 7/8/9, TT 7. So far the best plastic line is the TT7.

Overall, most enjoyable line to throw is a silk DT 7 with no shooting required!

William
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post #13 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-28-2002, 10:30 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: GardenerDate: 1/28/2002 7:30 PM
Steven/Inland
 
Greetings from England.  Interested to hear you are considering greenheart.  I used greenheart rods, both single and double handed, quite a bit as a teenager in the late '70s, because that was what was available to me.  They were fun, especially when a fish put a good bend in a rod and you would feel it flex right down to the reel seat, but cannot be compared to modern rods as casting tools.  I still have several rods, ranging from 13' to 16', and have cast them all, but they now live in the attic.
 
The problem is that the wood becomes brittle as it dries out.  I spoke to the guys at Clan rods a few years ago, and they said there was little that could be done about this, although they suggested stripping the varnish off and putting the rod somewhere damp (like under a hedge) for at least six months.  The rods don't like modern houses with central heating - designed to be kept in a damp rod room in a Scottish or Irish Victorian fishing lodge I suppose.  The breakage problem is worse with rods with ferrules rather than splices, because of the 'flat spot' created.  I wonder if Clan have found a way to treat the wood to prevent it drying out.
 
There appears to be little interest in greenheart rods as collectors' pieces in UK.  I suppose this is because of this breakage problem, (although similar problems associated with old glues in cane rods don't seem to put people off).  A few years ago I asked about selling a couple of mine (Grant Vibrations - supposedly the best make & model) in a tackle auction (including collectors items) & was told they wouldn't even accept them into the sale, as there was no market.  So they will stay in my attic until people start to appreciate them.  Is there more interest elsewhere in the world?
 
One observation on the weight issue - I still have the bottom two sections (tips sadly long gone) of the 14' greenheart my great-grandmother used on the Spey in the 1950's.  This was apparently considered a fairly light rod, suitable for a woman in her 60's!  
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post #14 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-28-2002, 11:21 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: HuckleberryDate: 1/28/2002 8:21 PM
A while back someone mentioned a modern rod maker who builds two-handed rods using the name Shenandoah rods. As far as I remember they were rated very favourably. The URL is:
http://www.shentel.net/canerod/HTML/RodsFrame-1.html

Cheers

TomÏ
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post #15 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-29-2002, 06:40 AM Thread Starter
 
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Originator: Peter-s-cDate: 1/29/2002 3:40 AM
Norman Agutters in the UK sells bamboo kits and blanks.  I've no idea what they're like to fish with but they're a temptation, nevertheless.
 
Peter
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