Input on 10 weights - Spey Pages
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-28-2000, 10:14 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: SinktipDate: 5/28/2000 6:14 AM
I'm looking at picking up a 10 weight in the next few months and was interested in the input of the board.  I currently fish a 9140-4 and am looking for something to better handle heavier tips for winter fishing on the Sky, Sauk and Skagit.  I have tenatively narrowed down my choices to the 10150-4 Sage and the 15' #10 Scott. Curious to see if anyone here as spent any time with both of these models and can give me some opinions on the pros and cons of each. I was considering the 10151-4 as well but have heard between the breakage problem and the Sage "fix", this might not be a good option.
ISC Archives is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-28-2000, 12:15 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: Per StadighDate: 5/28/2000 8:15 AM

Hello Sinktip,

I have used the 1501 a lot. For me it is a fine rod for floating and sub surface lines (intermediate - slowsink) When using it for heftier sinkers and long sinktips combined with larger flies I think it is a bit too soft - both for rolloing the sunk line up and for the final delivery.

Of the Scott I have no idea. Apparently both Dana and Bubba swear by it - they should know.

On that one trip I made to the Skagit/Sauk I recognised them to be like big Norwegian rivers. Obviously long casting and good linecontrol pays. If I should fish one rod on those great waters it would be the T&T 16'. It is a far more versatile rod than the length and line weight indicates. Being an enormous powerhouse it still has enough sensitivity it the butt to cope safely with smaller fish. Strangly very few on your side seem to have tried it. It is a fantastic rod.

Per 

 

ISC Archives is offline  
post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-29-2000, 10:08 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: SpeyrdDate: 5/29/2000 6:08 PM

 

ISC Archives is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-29-2000, 10:09 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: DanaDate: 5/29/2000 6:09 PM
  I’ve fished the Sage 10150-4 for a number of years. It’s a medium action, easy casting Spey rod that handles long lines and tips quite well. Although you’ll notice a difference in feel between the 9140-4 and the 10150-4, the actions are similar.

 I spent a few hours with the new Scott in March. It is a fast, powerful rod that throws very tight loops. Because it’s so quick, there’s little margin for error in the casting stroke, and one’s timing has to be exact. You’ll probably want to overline this rod for Spey casting.

 As for the 10151-4, most of the people I know who have had problems with it are long-line Spey casters; those fishing shooting heads or Windcutter-style lines seem to be pleased with its performance. Despite the problems, it is a very sweet casting rod.

 As with any rod purchase, the best bet is to test cast the rods. You’re in the Seattle area, right? If you’re interested, I can probably get my hands on all three rods, so e-mail me and we’ll set something up so that you can throw them back-to-back.

 Best,

 Dana

[email protected]

ISC Archives is offline  
post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-29-2000, 10:17 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: SpeyrdDate: 5/29/2000 6:17 PM

Hello Sinktip,

Am in agreement with Per.

Developed a love hate relationship with the 10150-4.

Leroy.............

ISC Archives is offline  
post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-30-2000, 12:04 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: Per StadighDate: 5/29/2000 8:04 PM

Just to avoid confusion:

Are we talking of the same rod? When I read Dana's entry I all of a sudden felt uncertain. The rod I am refering to is the 15'1" Graphite IV 4 piece. The 1510 Spey version, an older model I think, I never have tried.

Sorry if I goofed this up.

Per

ISC Archives is offline  
post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 05-31-2000, 02:53 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: kushDate: 5/30/2000 10:53 PM
If you are considering going up to a 10wt for bigger rivers and heavier tips and will still have your lighter rods for other situations then why not consider the Sage 10160? Dana uses this rod regularly, as does Derek Brown. I have cast it a number of times and was very impressed.

The reason I bought my 10151 is that Derek Brown, when I pinned him down said that it was the ultimate "big rod" (now I regularly use a Bruce & Walker 18' so that is relative), as it turns out he was refering to the prototype 10151 that he had been given and not what turned out to be the actual production rod. Since I've broken my 10151 twice and can no longer trust it alone on the river I sure wish I'd got the 10160 instead. For big water and tips it certainly has the guts, yet it doesn't appear to overpower medium sized fish. In fact, if someone wants to buy my 10151 ...

tight lines - tyle
ISC Archives is offline  
post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 06-09-2000, 05:03 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 3,411
Originator: bubbaDate: 6/9/2000 1:03 AM
fun discussion.

my two cents: the sage 10160 feels like i'm casting a telephone pole. the 10151 (graphite IV) is a sweet casting rod to about 110 feet with a floater, but is a bit "mushy", and i would have serious reservations casting a heavy sink tip with it (i.e. breakage!). the 10150-4 feels a lot like a slightly bigger version of the 9140, with the same shortfalls as the 9140 (and 7136 for that matter, nice feel though).

i must repectfully disagree with dana on the scott 15'10 weight (the newer one with black and silver guide wrapping)... i don't think it is a demanding rod to cast at all, and it is not exceptionally fast in action (althoughfaster than the old ARC 10 weight); the scott spey rods always have had gads of power in the butt and handle sinktips very well.

i recently cast, back to back, a whole bunch of 9 and 10 weight rods with floating and sinking tips, all at the same distance, all with the same lines and reel (to get an objective comparison). to be very honest, the best rod for long casts with heavy sink tips for my style of casting was a hardy 10 weight 15 foot three piece called the "salar". the componentry is really embarassingly poor (a plastic reel seat for crying out loud), but what a great stick! took it fishing and was hitting (no exaggeration here) 125 feet 19 out of 20 casts with 15 feet of DWE 550 on the end.

i recently got the hardy elite 15'4" 10 weight, and will be giving that a whirl. looks like a similar action to the salar. also getting a couple of rods from david norwich in scotland to play with.

bottom line:
if you are carrying a long line, using a sink tip, i don't think you can go wrong with the scott ARC 1510. if you like to cast far, and are pretty good at casting, you might consider the Hardy Salar 10 wieght 15'. if you cast like Per, a faster rod may be more to your liking. don't get the 10151-4 (graphite IV).
ISC Archives is offline  
 

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Spey Pages forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Linear Mode Linear Mode
Rate This Thread:



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome