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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-26-2013, 08:30 AM Thread Starter
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Klickitat river

Just booked my first trip to the west coast on Sept 29 th and I'm stoked out of my mind!! I live in southern NJ and frequently fish the NY state Ontario tribs! I've never caught a true anadromous steelhead as Lake Ontario is land locked fresh! Ill be fishing at the Evening Hatch Steelhead Ranch. So many beautiful rivers out west it's amazing !!
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-26-2013, 11:06 AM
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Excited for you. The klickitat was my home waters for many years. I know it well. The canyon section is as wild and beautiful as you can get for the lower 48. Cougar, bear, wild turkey, coyote, rattlers, lynx, you name it. Feel good you are staying at the Lodge. Not quite the same now that its being guided so heavily, but The Evening Hatch will put you on fish. If you want to swing make sure you request to do so, as they like the bead game. You will undoubtedly enjoy your trip.

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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-26-2013, 11:19 AM
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Awesome choice. I was working across the bridge at Hood River and took a ride over there even though it was closed above the Fisher Hill bridge. I've fished it in late summer early fall, hope to include it in my next PNW "loop" from homebase Boston (formerly Seattle).

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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-26-2013, 11:33 AM Thread Starter
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Thx

Thx for the info, yeah the terrain out there looks beautiful. I'm planning on swinging the entire trip, I've nymph/bead fished the last 30 yrs of my life and I've caught a bunch of fish doing it. I just started SPEY casting 2 years ago and it's really all I want to do, incredibly addicting way of catching steelies! I'm not a numbers guy, and touching a bunch of fish isn't a huge priority. That initial take, the hard runs, and aerial display they put on is more than enough. I'm actually planning on staying 2 extra days and hopefully ill be able to walk and wade myself and find a couple fish.
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-26-2013, 11:38 AM
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Exclamation A heads up.

One word of caution vis a vis fishing rivers in Washington State. Their game department changes the fishing reg's close (one place or another) almost weekly. You can log into the WFGD's web site and sign up for the e-mail feeds.

Oregon also changes their Reg's but on a far less frequent basis. They have a similar site (e-mail straight into your in box).

Reason for this is the fishing reg's are drawn up based upon (catch, where, for what, when, etc) months before the reg books are printed up/distributed. "Plan A" isn't working out so we're going to Plan B, then C as the season progress.''

Fred




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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-26-2013, 11:44 AM
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make sure your guide knows you want to swing....not bobber and bead fish from the boat... the Klick can be a fickle stream be patient.

"Never be afraid to show love" Frank Moore
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-26-2013, 12:29 PM Thread Starter
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Swinging

I'm not into the bead thing, did it a couple years here in NY, yeah it's effective but I just never understood the whole concept of the rigging the bead 3 inches from the hook. I'm sure there's an explanation and I've heard guys say less fish are " gut hooked". The only time I've gut hooked a trout was as a kid fishing live bait. Soo much pressure in NY where I fish that its so tuff to find a run that's open and hasn't been hammered with guys chucking shot, hopefully ill have the opportunity to swing some beautiful water!
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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-26-2013, 01:43 PM
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Beads

I have used the beads in Alaska, much to my chagrin. The lodge said that it was the only way to catch trout. We caught a lot, and everyone of them had misshapen jaws and significant hook scars. Did not like it a bit, but there really was no alternative provided, even though we talked about it. I can't remember the last "gut-hooked" trout I caught. The beads are a very good imitation of what the trout are eating, but I question whether it is necessary to place the bead 2-3" away from the hook, then snag the fish.

Jim

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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-26-2013, 08:13 PM
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Had Nate Bailey (a guide) showed me the rig a couple of weeks ago. Knew about the use of beads, but had no idea the hook was left to 'dangle.' Apparently the reason for this is when the fish sucks in the bead the dangling hook goes in first and the bead doesn't close some of the hook gap.

Obviously the rig is very effective when used with a 'ring eye' hook. Even if the beads spit out, the hooks still in the fishes mouth.




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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-26-2013, 09:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fredaevans View Post
Had Nate Bailey (a guide) showed me the rig a couple of weeks ago. Knew about the use of beads, but had no idea the hook was left to 'dangle.' Apparently the reason for this is when the fish sucks in the bead the dangling hook goes in first and the bead doesn't close some of the hook gap.

Obviously the rig is very effective when used with a 'ring eye' hook. Even if the beads spit out, the hooks still in the fishes mouth.
Fred:

The reason guides champion the bead system is that when the fish sucks in the bead, the hook snags the fish outside the mouth, thereby preventing the fish from being gut hooked. As I mentioned, I can't remember the last time I gut hooked a steelhead or trout using a nymph, glo-bug, or any other fly for that matter.


HTH,

Jim

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post #11 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-26-2013, 09:31 PM
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It's probably popular with guides because it allows newer or inexperienced people who may be sleeping or slow on the draw (ie not knowing what to look for when a fish grabs) to still hook the fish due to the fish taking the beads deep. If someone is slow on setting the hook, the hook outside or at the front of the mouth does not, potentially, get into the throat or gill rakers.

I imagine it's both conservation and catch numbers driven as a technique. And just as an aside, if fish have destroyed mouths due to constantly being caught it's probably a combination of not barbless and/or too large a hook, not to mention being caught over and over more than being hooked on the outside of the mouth.

Mike
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post #12 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-26-2013, 09:31 PM
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Thanks Jim, never fished with 'beads,' but did find the rig interesting, and obviously effective by the looks of it. Here we'd call that "Flossing." Probably the same where-ever.

Fred




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post #13 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-26-2013, 11:47 PM
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So much ignorance it's funny. You guys should get out and fish more.

The bead rig is setup with a hook below a pegged bead for a couple reasons. 1) it separates bead and hook. A bead with a piece of bent metal stuck to it looks unnatural. 2) separating bead and hook allows you to use a smaller less invasive hook. Glo bugs and yarnies are soft. When a steelhead or trout eats one there is no material in the way of the hook. Stick a bead on the eye of the hook and the plastic bead guards the point and closes the gap of the hook. Why do you think drift fishermen who run corkies and similar drifters run such large hooks? 3) rigged in this fashion you will never gut hook a fish.

It is not flossing or snagging. Both flossing and snagging involve hooking unwilling fish. When a fish moves and intercepts a bead.... Well it ate it. Same as any other method. I just landed a beautiful chrome spring chinook on the outside of the lip. It crushed a 4 inch long tube fly on the swing. 5 feet of t14 in a choppy boily inside trough. Am I a snagger or flosser?

I very very rarely hook any steelhead outside of the mouth with the bead. An adult steelhead has a pretty large mouth. They easily inhale a small 8mm bead and 2 inches of tippet and a #4 octopus hook. They actually spit it out back out very quickly it takes a steelhead moments to realize that egg was hard plastic and they shake it out quick.

Any other ugly rumors I can squash? I'm here all night.

Klicks an awesome river you will love it. You picked a great outfit you will have a great time swinging flies
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post #14 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-27-2013, 12:02 AM
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Honestly don't know Jim/Sean, never used 'the system' or seen same in operation so have no view on the how it works, save for 'intuition.' But given the wide use, something has to work for what ever reason.




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post #15 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-22-2013, 10:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sean Beauchamp View Post
So much ignorance it's funny. You guys should get out and fish more.

The bead rig is setup with a hook below a pegged bead for a couple reasons. 1) it separates bead and hook. A bead with a piece of bent metal stuck to it looks unnatural. 2) separating bead and hook allows you to use a smaller less invasive hook. Glo bugs and yarnies are soft. When a steelhead or trout eats one there is no material in the way of the hook. Stick a bead on the eye of the hook and the plastic bead guards the point and closes the gap of the hook. Why do you think drift fishermen who run corkies and similar drifters run such large hooks? 3) rigged in this fashion you will never gut hook a fish.

It is not flossing or snagging. Both flossing and snagging involve hooking unwilling fish. When a fish moves and intercepts a bead.... Well it ate it. Same as any other method. I just landed a beautiful chrome spring chinook on the outside of the lip. It crushed a 4 inch long tube fly on the swing. 5 feet of t14 in a choppy boily inside trough. Am I a snagger or flosser?

I very very rarely hook any steelhead outside of the mouth with the bead. An adult steelhead has a pretty large mouth. They easily inhale a small 8mm bead and 2 inches of tippet and a #4 octopus hook. They actually spit it out back out very quickly it takes a steelhead moments to realize that egg was hard plastic and they shake it out quick.

Any other ugly rumors I can squash? I'm here all night.

Klicks an awesome river you will love it. You picked a great outfit you will have a great time swinging flies
I have watched fish eat this rig and they spit it out with amazing speed. The only point Sean didn't cover in this awesome post is the absolute neccessity of the angler to be vigilant for the take. Steelhead, even up to 38", that I have hooked on this system take with alarming delicacy. It is so subtle that I often have to dictate to anglers I show this rig to when to set. in fact experience has taught me that the larger the fish the more subtle the take. i have learned more regarding the take from fishing this system than any other form of fishing. Don't hate til you try it.
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