River Tweed - Spey Pages
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Rating: Thread Rating: 3 votes, 5.00 average. Display Modes
post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-22-2013, 10:56 AM Thread Starter
K-Roc
 
kevbine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: BC
Posts: 193
River Tweed

Hi all, i am lucky enough to be invited to tag along with my girlfriend to a family reunion of sorts in Scotland, minutes away from the Tweed. We'll be there the first week of July. Unfortunately I might only get to fish it one or two days...
As a steelhead guy from BC I would love to get some input on the gear and flies I should be bringing as well as the techniques I would use to potentially catch my first Atlantic.
I am thinking either using a skagit or a scandi line with maybe an intermediate sinktip and a fairly small orange fly with shrimp like personality like a GP... European style seems to dictate floating lines and different weights of tube flies but it seems like in BC and PNW we use the same fly but different tips in order to fish different depths...

Any and all advice regarding Scottish Atlantics would be greatly appreciated!
Kevin
kevbine is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-23-2013, 06:46 AM
Registered User
 
G Ritchie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Deveron, Dee, Don, Spey, Findhorn
Posts: 134
Unless the water level is high, then at that time of the season a lot of the fishing will be done with floating lines with maybe the addition of a sinking polyleader depending on the configuration of the pool being fished. Flies will generally be small double hooks in sizes 8 down to 12 in patterns such as the Cascade, Ally's or Flamethrower and if the water is low and clear, small hairwing doubles of the Stoats Tail type. A floating scandi head with a selection of polyleaders will work fine for most situations.
G Ritchie is offline  
post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-23-2013, 08:16 AM
Registered User
 
wrx_canoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: GBay and L.Ont. Tribs
Posts: 1,679
I'm no expert only having fished Atlantics twice in July in Ireland but definitely leave your Skagit head at home. Lower water, small flies don't require such a big head. PLUS the locals won't laugh at you and wonder why you're fishing a "brick."

Good luck!
wrx_canoe is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-23-2013, 08:32 AM
''Speydo-masochist''
 
Tyke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: UK, Towy, Tweed, Dee, Deveron
Posts: 1,265
Graham is quite correct with his comments above.

You may also wish to consider putting in a longish single hander of say #7wt, or a light switch & a selection of small flies ["wee doubles" such as size 10 - 14 stoat's tail, silver stoat etc] as, depending on where you book, the Tweed can have some good runs of sea trout [sea-run browns] at this time of year & these can be of a very good size so don't go too light on the tippet.

Our weather is very variable at the moment & we have had a very late start to the spring so I am loathe to make any recommendations as to where to fish other than to say that if water levels are low then the bottom river beats will be the best, but higher water will encourage the fish to run straight through these beats & the lower/ middle river beats will then be the better option. The upper river beats [above the Ettrick] should be left alone until later in the year.

So you can flip a coin & book now with the certainty that you will have your fishing secured; or wait untill a few days before when the conditions are more certain & book accordingly - book on the web via fishpal with a credit card & it is a 24/7 service so you can leave this to the daty before if you prefer.

I hope this helps.

Regards, Tyke.
Tyke is offline  
post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-23-2013, 12:24 PM Thread Starter
K-Roc
 
kevbine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: BC
Posts: 193
Thank you for the excellent advice everyone, I really appreciate it and will leave the skagit line at home. I have a few more questions..
- How long of a leader would you run off of an intermediate sinktip? I was thinking about 3-5 feet. Off a floating i would probably run a 15 ft mono leader.

- Is an 8 weight 13 ft rod good enough for the Tweed?

- I might order up some pot belly pig bottle tube flies, 15mm tube, in both copper tube and aluminum tubes. Are there other patterns that you would consider must haves? I only have time to fish a day or two so I dont really want to spend hundreds on flies I may only use once.

- I will bring a single hander for trout, a 6 wt as I dont own a 7. I'll have to look up this stoat fly. I have many many steelhead and trout flies for BC, do you have any idea if they'd work in Scotland? I have large orange GPs on tubes but I have a feeling they'll be too big for low water...

Thanks again,
Kevin
kevbine is offline  
post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-23-2013, 01:45 PM
''Speydo-masochist''
 
Tyke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: UK, Towy, Tweed, Dee, Deveron
Posts: 1,265
Your leader choices sound fine; I like a tapered flurocabon leader, & add a sacrificial tippet of f/c which I replace as required, to fish off a full floater when I don't need to achieve additional depth.

In Summer a 13 ft 8 wt should be fine, you should be able to wade most of the pools at this time & a heavier line could be a bit too splashy.

Don't get too hung up on the patterns of flies; look them up & if you have something similar with a different name this will fine - I've never encountered a salmon that read a fly pattern book yet. The size is more important; if the river is low & clear & the temperature of the water is up in the 50s or 60s [God forbid it reaches the 70s] then you will need to go small size 12 or 14 doubles at the warmer end [or mini tubes of 0.5" & less] or size 10s & 12s if in the high 50s etc.

I would include a few cascades, stoat's tail & silver stoats tail, tosh, munro's killer & in case the fish are refusing the standard stuff a few small red francis tied on 0.25" & 0.5" copper tubes which you fish off a full floater & twitch back so they rise & fall as they swing around - similarly when all else fails try stripping a sunray shadow/ collie dog or dee monkey by casting square & drawing back quite quickly in long pulls. Both of these will often result in a take when all else has failed but don't use them as the initial approach as they can scare the fish & either put them down or chase them out of the pool.

If you go for the sea trout fish small & tie up a leader with one or two droppers so you can present 2 or 3 different patterns, some times a small muddler on the top dropper fished waking the surface will catch, or at least encourage a fish to follow which will then take one of the other 2 flies coming after it a little deeper in the water - this sometimes works well for grilse & even larger salmon on occasion.

Take a wading staff so you can get into position without having to do the back-stroke, & don't forget that some of the lower beats will have a boat which the gillie may take you out in if he feels this is the best way to cover a specific pool; try not to hook him whilst casting as this can strain relations in a small boat thereafter.

Regards, Tyke.
Tyke is offline  
post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-23-2013, 02:09 PM Thread Starter
K-Roc
 
kevbine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: BC
Posts: 193
That's fantastic info, thanks Tyke. I'll let you know how I make out.
I dont think many of my flies for trout will work although my partridge and orange soft hackles might be not be bad. Most of my steelhead flies are massive... I'll swing by the local tackle shop and get some there. Canadian Tube flies make beautiful salmon tubes but they are backed up for three months!
Kevin
kevbine is offline  
post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-23-2013, 03:23 PM
jap
stuck in Duesseldorf...
 
jap's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: none close by...
Posts: 129
Hi Kevin,
regarding technique: Atlantics like a pretty fast swung fly and tend to lay in faster water. That might be different than Stealhead fishing. I always see lots of mends in stealhead flicks. No need for that when fishing for salmon...let it swing.
Cheers
David
jap is offline  
post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-24-2013, 12:41 PM Thread Starter
K-Roc
 
kevbine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: BC
Posts: 193
That's good info David. I think your rivers probably run a bit slower than the ones here too though but you're right, many times with steelhead you mend two or more times at the start of your swing to let the fly sink and to slow down the presentation.
I ordered some 15mm tube Pot Bellied Pigs from Canadian Tube Flies, very happy about that. The rest of the flies such as Stoat's I'll hopefully find at a local shop.
Can't wait to stand in the storied waters of the Tweed, catching a salmon will truly be a bonus!
Kevin
kevbine is offline  
post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-24-2013, 02:52 PM
Registered User
 
speyghillie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: river spey
Posts: 614
Send a message via Yahoo to speyghillie
River Tweed

Hi Kevbine,
I have been lucky enough to have fished for Steelhead in BC for many years and live 5 mins walk from the Spey, the fishing is not really that different, I have had Steelhead on the flies I use in Scotland, and Atlantic's on some small Steelhead patterns I took back from BC.
Where are you staying while in God's country and the home of all things Spey, depending on where you are staying it would make your whole trip to have a day with one of the best and one of the nicest guys you will ever meet.

http://www.eoinfairgrieve.co.uk/spey...ction-22-w.asp

Cheers Gordon.
DTX Pro Staff.
speyghillie is offline  
post #11 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-24-2013, 05:49 PM
Registered User
 
flyspoke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: New England
Posts: 54
Scotland The Beautiful

You are truly heading into one of the best places on earth. I have traveled the world and could spend the rest of my days in Scotland and have no need to leave. I have loved every minute being there and have fished each trip. My wife is Scottish with family in Glasgow.

The most important thing to be sure of is the water you will occupy. In July on Tweed I would not want to be too far up river. The upper river is good from part of September to the end of the season so long as the water is up.

Here is a link to all the available beats with the catch statics for the last number of years by month. What you will find is that July will need some work to get better water. It can also tell you what is available. Making contact with as many people there is a smart idea.
http://www.fishpal.com/Scotland/Twee...asp?dom=Salmon

For line a mid belly with a 14 foot 8 weight rod will do fine. You will want to have a few poly or versi leaders from 1.5 to 7 ips sink rate so you are ready for conditions. At that time of year you will want some very small flies on fine leaders. Have a few a wee bit larger but the small ones will fair well. The simple patters would be my choice. I have done well in Scotland with a Canadian pattern called a John Olin. Simple gold, yellow and black.
No matter what, going to Scotland is a wonderful experience. From Highlands to Upper Lowlands to the Boarders there is something to stir the imagination around every turn. I look forward to our next family trip.

All the best of luck and please let me know if I can offer any further info.

William

IFFF - CCI,THCI
flyspoke is offline  
post #12 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-24-2013, 06:34 PM
''Speydo-masochist''
 
Tyke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: UK, Towy, Tweed, Dee, Deveron
Posts: 1,265
If the water Levels are low then your 15mm pot bellied pigs may be a bit too big ( remember the 15mm applies to the size of the tube not the length of the fully dressed fly) so then you will need the smaller dressed flies. If the river is up a bit then the pbp's will be fine; but still take some small doubles just in case - & particularly for the sea trout.

If the river is up a foot & a half above summer low, then don't ignore some of the minor tactics I mentioned above.

Regards, Tyke.
Tyke is offline  
post #13 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-24-2013, 06:46 PM Thread Starter
K-Roc
 
kevbine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: BC
Posts: 193
Ok, I will get some of the PBPs tied small and sparse. What size hook would you put on these tubes? When you say lighter tippets, you mean something like maybe 12 lbs. fluoro? I've always hesitated to use fluoro for steelhead and see friends breaking fish off with that material...
I really appreciate all the info,
Kevin
kevbine is offline  
post #14 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-24-2013, 07:37 PM
Registered User
 
flyspoke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: New England
Posts: 54
If You Don't Like It Don't Use It

I use Stroft 1X if the flies are small. If you must go another size smaller for really small stuff that is fine. The Stroft is 11.2 pounds at 2X yet really thin and supple.

You want to make sure that the fly has action. No need for Fluorocarbon if you don't want.

IFFF - CCI,THCI
flyspoke is offline  
post #15 of 15 (permalink) Old 05-24-2013, 08:09 PM
''Speydo-masochist''
 
Tyke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: UK, Towy, Tweed, Dee, Deveron
Posts: 1,265
I've always been happy with the premium flurocarbons (Seaguar etc), but I am picky about my knots as not all the knots which work well in nylon monofilament are suitable for flurocarbon.

Generally flurocarbon needs less turns on a knot ( possibly because it is much stiffer) than nylon; & I use simpler knots which work fine in flurocarbon - although I find the double turtle (at least the scruffy, ugly version I tie), work very well.

Strength wise, I wouldn't go below 8 lbs with the wee doubles for sea trout as you may hook a big'un or a salmon; & with the double hander then something around the 10lb mark would be my lower limit in lower flows - this should be fine on your proposed 13ft 8 wt as long as you don't clamp down on the fish in the initial stages when they tend to be a little lively!

Other than that it comes down to a sense of balance, you wouldn't fish a size 14 double on a 25 lb point, or a 3 inch copper tube on an 8 lb point. So just match things up on a correctly balanced basis & proceed from there; remember the fish don't read the text books so they aren't too critical & there is always room to experiment - particularly when nothing else is working.

Regards, Tyke.
Tyke is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Spey Pages forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools Search this Thread
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Linear Mode Linear Mode
Rate This Thread:



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Grenfell tweed jacket worktofish Spey Classifieds 2 11-09-2012 09:23 AM
Grenfell tweed jacket worktofish Spey Classifieds 0 11-08-2012 05:12 PM
Information about Tweed Namaycush Destinations 1 02-06-2012 04:17 PM
the Tweed! Stampsteelie Destinations 4 11-07-2011 12:37 PM
Tweed fishing hats! brooklynangler Tackle 14 03-04-2005 03:45 PM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome