Oregon doctor dies on the Dean - Spey Pages
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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-23-2009, 10:53 PM Thread Starter
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Oregon doctor dies on the Dean

Oregon doctor Keith Hansen drowns on the Dean in BC.Does any body know the circumstances of this tragedy? Very sad.

My prayers go out for the family and friends of Kieth.

Mark
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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-23-2009, 10:58 PM
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So sad!

My heartfelt condolences to his family and friends.
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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-23-2009, 11:11 PM
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bunch of Buds are there now, will find out by thursday.
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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-23-2009, 11:14 PM
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Doctor, fly fisherman Keith Hansen dies
by Taylor Dungjen, The Oregonian
Tuesday August 18, 2009, 5:33 PM
Keith Hansen, a Portland doctor of oncology and seasoned fly fisherman, died in a fly-fishing accident Thursday on the Dean River in northwest British Columbia. Hansen was 63.

Hansen was an avid angler and conservationist of rivers and wild fish populations, says longtime friend Tom McAllister, 83, of Southwest Portland. McAllister and Hansen served together on the Flyfisher Foundation board. At the time of his death, Hansen was the foundation's vice president.

"As flyfishers go, nobody was more passionate about it," McAllister says about Hansen's conservation efforts.

Hansen, a medical oncologist for the Northwest Cancer Specialists and a stem-cell transplant expert, founded the Legacy Health System's stem-cell transplant program in 1989. Hansen was also a key factor in establishing the Northwest Marrow Transplant Program, which is now affiliated with Oregon Health and Science University.

"His death has created a void that's going to be very difficult to fill," says Dr. Gerald Segal, 54, of Southeast Portland, who worked with Hansen for 13 years.

As a doctor, Hansen was influential in training medical students in their residency.

"They not only learned hematology and medical oncology," Segal says, "but how to act as a physician, to do whatever was necessary to ensure that your patients get the best possible care. He was truly a great role model."

Outside of flyfishing and the hospital, friends remember Hansen's quick wit, sense of humor and culinary abilities.

"He was such a great host," McAllister says. "He just had a zest for life."

Hansen is survived by his wife, Lisa, his two children, Eric and Karen, and two stepsons, Gabe and Ryan Trif.

-- Taylor Dungjen, [email protected]
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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-24-2009, 12:34 PM
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Keith lost his footing while fishing cottonwood, below 5 mile river right, and was sucked into the log jam. Sad day for the Dean, lodges, and for those that knew him, a true champion and advocate for native fish.

Chas
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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-24-2009, 04:25 PM
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Rest in Peace Keith. Your work was appreciated more than you will ever know

Deepest condolences to the family. Here is a pic I found on the web
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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-25-2009, 09:15 AM
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Chas,
Thank you for the explanation.

Log jams are deadly. The Simms free video discusses and demonstrates how and how not to deal with log jams in such circumstances.

Support Spey O Rama by joining GGACC (San Francisco's Golden Gate Angling & Casting Club) at http://www.ggacc.org/p/p.aspx?mlid=6.

http://flyfishingresearch.net/ for science based information on fly fishing.
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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-25-2009, 10:52 AM
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Bob....do you have a link to that video clip. It would be a very valuable clip for all to see?

By the way....I went to your website in your signature line. Great bit of info there. Thanks for all the research, I am sure others will benefit as well...check it out.

Thanks and best regards

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Last edited by Norseman; 08-25-2009 at 09:03 PM.
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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-25-2009, 07:44 PM
 
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Tragic

Thats really tragic. I shudder to even think how it occured, how it unfolded.
So sad for the family... the children.

I would like this Simms logjam clip myself. I'm glad we do not have anything like that to wade thru / around / in .. around here.

Mkes you stop and think. Brian
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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-25-2009, 11:01 PM
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Paul,
I have a copy in VHS tape. The Simms rep requested a CD/DVD copy for me a couple of weeks ago.

If Simms has it posted, I was unable to find it. In the hope that someone may be saved I'll recount the major points I remember: Wear 2 wading belts; when you go down in the river, throw your rod toward shore and save yourself; when swept down river approaching a log jam begin to swim in a crawl stroke and swim over the log[s]--if your legs go under a log and your arms go over the log you will die.

Speypages or Simms would do a great service posting this video on line.

Thank you for your kind words re FlyFishingResearch.net.

Support Spey O Rama by joining GGACC (San Francisco's Golden Gate Angling & Casting Club) at http://www.ggacc.org/p/p.aspx?mlid=6.

http://flyfishingresearch.net/ for science based information on fly fishing.
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post #11 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-25-2009, 11:26 PM
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Thanks Bob.

I would add one thing....something I have been doing more and more of.

Wear a life jacket. It may not save you in a log jam, but on most other parts of the river it will. We are all getting a bit older and not as agile or as strong as we think we are. Do you loved ones a favor and wear a pfd. I use the mustang belt that inflates to a full life jacket. Stays out of the way and is nice and small.

Best regards
Paul

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post #12 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-26-2009, 12:28 AM
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Life jackets

I filled my waders once and since then have used the stearns inflatable chest pack it carry's just the right amount of JUNK YOU THINK YOU NEED TO FISH form a boat where you have to get out of to fish on the deschuttes.
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post #13 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-26-2009, 11:31 AM
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While the tragic loss of a friend and loved one is very sad and my heart goes out to all effected. I can't help but think that passing on while doing what you love with friends is preferable to most alternatives.Tight lines and leaping silver up there Kieth.
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post #14 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-26-2009, 01:47 PM
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Bob is correct...in swiftwater rescue training we were taught that if a logjam is unavoidable...turn on your stomach and swim like hell at it getting you legs out from under you...then force yourself up onto the jam beaching yourself up there instead of getting pinned against it.

easier said than done but we did it in training. my condolences to the family and friends.

-zack


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Originally Posted by Bob Pauli View Post
Paul,
I have a copy in VHS tape. The Simms rep requested a CD/DVD copy for me a couple of weeks ago.

If Simms has it posted, I was unable to find it. In the hope that someone may be saved I'll recount the major points I remember: Wear 2 wading belts; when you go down in the river, throw your rod toward shore and save yourself; when swept down river approaching a log jam begin to swim in a crawl stroke and swim over the log[s]--if your legs go under a log and your arms go over the log you will die.

Speypages or Simms would do a great service posting this video on line.

Thank you for your kind words re FlyFishingResearch.net.
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post #15 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-26-2009, 01:52 PM
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Strainers

Logjams or 'strainers' are deadly.

Once upon a time I was a certified Swiftwater Rescue Technician. Part of our training was dealing with strainers. A simple exercise of placing a log across a stream moving at moderate pace and then swimming up to it and trying to climb over it demonstrated just how difficult strainers can be.

In short, NEVER try and go under a log/tree in the hopes of coming out on the other side. ALWAYS try and swim (front crawl) up to the parts exposed just above water and try and get as much of your body up on top of the log.

Often your lower body (legs) will then get sucked under the log. With the moving current it's extremely difficult to lift your legs out under the log and up onto the log. Turning sideways and carefully shimming your legs up the side of the horizontal log helps. If you're really strong you can sometimes use your arms to jack yourself out.

If you're too weak or tired to use your arms or legs your best bet is to hug the log and call for help. Unfortunately if there's no help you'll be in a predicament that you can't get out of.

The scenario I describe here is one with a log. If it's much smaller branches and not lying horizontal it can be much more challenging. Still in such a scenario you should try and get up as high as possible on the above water parts of the tree/log.

Lastly, wading in fast water is always a dangerous activity. Try not to wade too deep. Aside from simply being washed away there's the serious problem of foot entrapment. If you're wading deep and your foot gets suck or pinned there's a good chance the water will then push you over and you'll drown, still stuck to the rock. That's another exercise SRTs train for.

Be safe out there. I feel for his family and friends.
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