Recommendations for rubber-soled boots - Spey Pages
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 1 votes, 5.00 average. Display Modes
post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-12-2012, 02:18 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
tpak's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: New York
Posts: 43
Recommendations for rubber-soled boots

I need to get a new pair of wading boots for Alaska, so no felt soles. Also, I will be fishing out of boats and float planes, so nothing with studs or cleats. I've seen a lot of discussions about rubber soles, but most of them deal with studded or cleated soles. What is everyone's best recommendation for pure rubber bottom boots?

I used to have the old Korkers with Aquastealth soles and I thought those actually offered pretty decent grip in slippery conditions, but those boots finally fell apart and Korkers no longer offers Aquastealth. I then got the original Korkers Kling-on soles, but I found those not to be good in slippery conditions. However, I hear that the new Kling-ons are much better gripping and I can see from Korkers website pictures that the new Kling-ons are different in design from my old Kling-ons.

Several guides I fished with up in Alaska also like the Simms Streamtread, but I have always found Simms boots to be heavy.

On the other hand I have always found Patagonia boots to be the most comfortable, but I have heard and read that the new Rock Grip rubber sole is no good without studs.

Thanks
tpak
tpak is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-12-2012, 02:35 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: north. Washington/south British Columbia
Posts: 1,483
Send a message via Yahoo to Nooksack Mac
With the recent concern about spreading parasites from one water to another, we're in a demanding new era. The question of a smooth sole material that will grip the bottom well but provide no surface for tiny nasties to hitch a ride on is now a great, unsolved problem.

Rubber sole waders and wading boots have been around at least since the 19th Century. Regardless of what the ads may claim for a rubber lug pattern, they're all treacherous on wet rocks. For getting in and out of boats, I see no point in spending several hundred dollars. Rubber sole waders have been available, at low prices, for a long time. Go to K-Mart or other purveyors of general fishing tackle and look for those cheap, rubber sole waders that we struggled with for decades.
Nooksack Mac is offline  
post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-12-2012, 06:53 PM
Registered User
 
chumbum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Alaska, Montana
Posts: 195
going into a second guiding season with Cabelas Ultralight 2 boots...really comfortable, sturdy enough, price is right ($70)...prepare to slip and slide on bigger cobbles/bedrock without cleats...
chumbum is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-13-2012, 10:10 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Fraser-Valley-B.C.
Posts: 289
Boots

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nooksack Mac View Post
With the recent concern about spreading parasites from one water to another, we're in a demanding new era. The question of a smooth sole material that will grip the bottom well but provide no surface for tiny nasties to hitch a ride on is now a great, unsolved problem.

Rubber sole waders and wading boots have been around at least since the 19th Century. Regardless of what the ads may claim for a rubber lug pattern, they're all treacherous on wet rocks. For getting in and out of boats, I see no point in spending several hundred dollars. Rubber sole waders have been available, at low prices, for a long time. Go to K-Mart or other purveyors of general fishing tackle and look for those cheap, rubber sole waders that we struggled with for decades.
Until someone comes out with a new soution to the parasite problem, the above solution seems to make sense unless of coarse you need chest waders. But even if you do need chect waders, some companies used to make chest waders with rubber soled boots attached. This could work until something better comes out which often happens.
harley is offline  
post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-13-2012, 10:17 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Coastal B.C.
Posts: 81
Get yourself a box of 1/2" hex head screws and stud them up good. I have about a dozen in each boot, and it makes things quite a bit less treacherous. I keep an old pair of feltsoles with no laces in them to slip into quickly for those times I have to pop into a tackle shop or the like so I don't destroy any ones floor.
High and Dirty is offline  
post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-13-2012, 11:26 AM
Lucky Bastard
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Salmon River NY
Posts: 660
Rubber sucks period if you don't use studs.Even then if you step on your edge,skating you will go.There is a reason Simms put felt back on their most popular boots.I have their guide boot with studs and you will never convince me otherwise.I keep an old pair if Hodgemen felt sole for that last min.boat invite.

Scott

With the hollow cries of a loon echoing off the mountains,the mist rises from the water like a thousand ghostly spirits freed at last of their earthly torments.It is here that my life falls into focus.
hooked is offline  
post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-13-2012, 11:42 AM
Registered User
 
Rodney K. Pabst's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: OP
Posts: 280
Studs & Boats

I always wear rubber soles with studs. I bring a rubber floor mat for when I am in a boat. Rubber soles without studs = getting dunked.

Note: When I was last in Alaska, we went into a market and there were signs saying "NO BOOTS WITH STUDS ALLOWED!" So now I carry a pair of wadding sandals in the car for market runs.

I have big feet, size 15 so my choices are limited. I have been wearing Orvis River Guard, Easy on Brogue Rubber soles with studs. Love them. Heavy and a little pricy, $198. But with my feet beggars can't be choosers.

Rod Pabst
Started DH in Jan 07, wish I had been doing it all along.

Last edited by Rodney K. Pabst; 04-13-2012 at 07:12 PM.
Rodney K. Pabst is offline  
post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-13-2012, 03:48 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Washington
Posts: 15
rubber

I think a lot of people who tried rubber boots early on hated them - the newer vibram soled boots from Simms have been awesome for me.

I bought the rivershed boot. and am so pleased with them I just ordered another two pairs so I don't have to worry about them being discontinued.

I personally feel like the new vibram sole is as good as the felt boots I was using before. I have not found the need to install cleats. I also like that this boot is very lightweight and allows me to hike a couple miles regularly. A lot of my fishing is on land and I like to get into the back country especially for trout. Most of my slipping with felt was on land in the mud. These rubber boots don't have that problem whatsover.

If you still think you need extra traction - and money is no issue - then I would check out the patagonia river tred boots and the new aluminum bar cleat system they have developed. That entire set-up will cost you about $500. But, you'll be able to use the bar cleats with any boots. They also have a new set of integrated bar cleats that look neat - but I can't see a pilot allowing you to wear those in his plane.
JesseCFowl is offline  
post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-13-2012, 10:26 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: western great lakes
Posts: 977
I second the simms riversheds..excellent boots, fairly light too...tough as hell.
kweetech is offline  
post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-13-2012, 10:39 PM
Registered User
 
chumbum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Alaska, Montana
Posts: 195
studded soles in DeHavilland Beaver = upset pilot...ditto for vinyl covered boat floors...
chumbum is offline  
post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-14-2012, 10:52 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 259
I thought that the Patagonia Rock Grip wading boots were pretty good. On clean rock, they were very good, almost as good as felt. On dirtier rock, they were like ice skates. I put the studs in and had better grip, but I promptly stepped on and broke my running line. (Note to self- learn not to step on your line). All in all, they were pretty good. When looking at rubber soles, I thought the Patagonia soles were more flexible than simms, allowing better contact and thus grip with the rocks, and WAAAAAY nicer to hike all day in. All told, I'm not sole(d) on rubber soles. I see their merit, but I've got to get to a stage where I'm more comfortable on them, and plan ahead better. Clean rock rivers- easy wading- rubber, Slick rock, or difficult wading- Felt (sanitized if I'm heading to a new river).

Last edited by rustyr; 04-14-2012 at 10:53 AM. Reason: added more drivel
rustyr is offline  
post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-14-2012, 12:55 PM
KJK
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: British Columbia
Posts: 277
Rubber soles suck

There are no rubber soled boots on the market that will keep you dry if you are using them to wade with. If you don't plan on getting your feet wet they should be fine, just do all your casting from shore.
This being said there is a boot that is better than most, but is not perfect. The new Patagonia boots with the aluminum bars, not cleats, on the soles. The aluminum bars are made of the softest aluminum they could get their hands on, so soft they degrade like felt and you would only get a season out of them if they were used a bunch. The upside is the aluminum is sticky as hell on any wet rock, you will be pleasantly surprised. Another positive is the bars have no profile on them, they are completely flat, about an inch wide and run from side to side on the boot.(I think that there are 5 bars in total on the boot) I have stepped on fly line with these boots, as we have all done at some time, and I didn't shred the line.
The downside of the boot is that there is still rubber between the aluminum in places. When you happen to put your foot down at an angle that contacts the rubber instead of the aluminum you will know it. They take a little getting used to as they aluminum gives you unbelievable grip, better than felt, and on the same boot you have rubber that is slippery as s#!t.
I am lucky enough to live in B.C. and I wear flet everywhere. If I had to travel, anywhere but New Zealand(as the aluminum makes a clicking noise that would spook their wary trout), I would wear these boots exclusively - no reservations.
I was lucky enough to to try out one of the prototypes last fall on the Skeena system for a couple of weeks. While not perfect they would be right up your alley for Alaska.
Kevin
KJK is offline  
post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-14-2012, 03:04 PM
Dedicated Fisherman
 
Hardyreels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Alaska, Skwentna to Kodiak
Posts: 3,076
Send a message via Skype™ to Hardyreels
I have used studded rubber since Orvis introduced their Henry's Fork Boot back in the early 90's. The original attraction was for use during the winter on spring creeks. Snow does not stick to them like the old felts. I discovered that I liked them and that they didn't drag a bunch of mud & water back into my truck when I moved from place to place on trout streams or salmon rivers. They have their advantages for sure.

As for falling down; I have not fallen into a river or creek while wearing felt or rubber since I fell into Little Pine Creel in Pennsylvania in 1978 so I am not a good source for falling in data. Here in Alaska there are rivers just as treacherous as anywhere I've ever lived or fished and I remain safe wearing rubber with a few cleats in the bottoms. Don't over cleat your soles, that can be as bad as no cleats at all. I use the new super bite jobs from Simms and put 3 on the heel and 5 on the front of the foot. Space them out well so that you have a combination of rubber and steel contacting the bottom strata rather than being held up by a dozen cleats on each shoe.

I also keep a heavy duty Folstaf on my belt for the worst of the worst, the added balance of having a support staff means more to me in deep swift water than does the question of whether I'm on felt or rubber. Some waders are sure footed while others may take a tumble while walking through shore side rubble. You just need to remember when you wade into a river that staying dry and staying safe take precedence over reaching the other shore or even catching a fish. Through the years I've found a balance that has kept me upright although sometimes I still take some risks that are unnecessary.

I don't argue over the rubber only law here and I would wade barefoot if that were the law. You just need to adhere to the regulations and when wearing rubber you gotta remember what Harry Callahan kept saying in the movie Magnum Force, "A man's gotta know his limitations".

By the way I have a new pair of simms Riversheds for this year and have retired the old rubber soled boots

Happy wading,

Ard

Kill the hens you kill the river, A Message For Alaskans
Hardyreels is offline  
post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-14-2012, 09:30 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Eugene town run
Posts: 5
I've got the Simms Headwater boots and after two seasons they have been the best wading boots to hike in I've ever had. They are quite light, but have great support. The streamtread soles alone are not adequate for the rivers I fish (N. Umpqua, McKenzie, MF Willamette) IMO.

I had the Patagonia boots and they didn't feel much if any lighter. The Pat's do have a disadvantage when it comes to adding studs - the Simms tread is much better for adding studs, again IMO.

After experimenting with the alumibite cleats, hardbite cleats, and hardbite studs I settled on the alumibites with some strategically placed hb studs and have felt pretty secure this winter (fished the NU seven times). The alumibites stick a little better without skating. To me the rubber sole is just something to attach studs to and as many as possible - you don't want any rubber to contact rock.

Haven't tried the new Patagonia aluminum bars but the reports have been glowing from the two people I know who have used them. They look weird to me.

My wife just got the new Korker system and she used them on the Metolious recently and gave them a big thumbs up (she had the patagonia's previously).
alancline is offline  
post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-14-2012, 11:18 PM
Super Moderator
 
montanafos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Big Sky Rivers & Clearwater River
Posts: 2,413
Patagonia Rock Grips

I like my Patagonia Rock Grips. Most comfortable pair of wading boots I've owned and incredibly light. If I decide I want studs I will get another pair of boots with studs. I have a Clackacraft and don't want to tear up the boat so rubber or felt in it and studs for wade fishing.
montanafos is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Spey Pages forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Linear Mode Linear Mode
Rate This Thread:



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to repair cracks in rubber boots? SteelieStudent Tackle 2 11-02-2011 12:28 PM
I need new boots...any recommendations? Greaseliner General 8 10-06-2011 02:44 PM
WTB or trade: vibram soled boots (the newer version) herl Spey Classifieds 1 02-24-2011 09:54 PM
Vibram soled guide boots? Riverborn75 Tackle 10 06-12-2009 09:24 AM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome