Fishing Nets - Spey Pages
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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-03-2019, 07:09 PM Thread Starter
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Fishing Nets

When fishing solo I use this Brodin net it is 14 1/2" x 19" opening and is 33" overall. I clip it to the ring on the back of my wading jacket with a magnetic release, works great. I'd be interested in what others use when wading and fishing alone. Or if they just tail the fish?
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Last edited by RobP; 12-03-2019 at 08:01 PM.
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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-03-2019, 07:15 PM
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I fish alone and tail the fish. I have seen fish damaged in nets so don’t use one.
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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-03-2019, 07:33 PM Thread Starter
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I understand that there are different opinions about to net or to not net. I'd be the last to say which is a better way. But I've done it both ways. Play the fish to the point of exhaustion and tail it or use a net. I use a net but always have the fish in the water when at all possible but that's just me. The new rubber or silicon material seem pretty gentle on the fish.
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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-03-2019, 08:31 PM
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I grab the hook and pull it out, usually without touching the fish. You must be quick and precise, it takes a little practice and pliers are helpful.

So my answer is C - none of the above.
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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-03-2019, 10:43 PM
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I grab the hook and pull it out, usually without touching the fish. You must be quick and precise, it takes a little practice and pliers are helpful.

So my answer is C - none of the above.
I have thought about this, but what do you do when the fish is played out. My concern is when slipping the hook, the fish swims off when it may not be fully recovered. Iím really thinking summer fish where water temps are warmer. Curious as to your thoughts and experience. I tail, prefer to use nets, and have done the hook release but the fish always seem to have a better release with the other methods in my experience. If Iím with a friend, the cradle net is perfect.

DH
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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-03-2019, 10:55 PM
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I do think impact of the net is greatly reduced if the fish is not lifted in the net, but just corralled.
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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-04-2019, 12:19 PM Thread Starter
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What convinced me to use a net was articles written by biologist about the stress the fish under goes when playing it to exhaustion. During a prolonged fight a fish builds up lactic acid in its system, that and the stress can prove to be fatal even though it swims off seemingly unharmed. But I was just trying to see what nets people prefer when I posted this. Rob
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post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-04-2019, 03:23 PM
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I grab the hook and pull it out, usually without touching the fish. You must be quick and precise, it takes a little practice and pliers are helpful.So my answer is C - none of the above.
If I can I hold the line grab the hook with pliers and let it go.
Never touch it and it doesn't leave the water
Failing that I'll hold the tail and take the hook out with the pliers.
And yes be fast and get it free asap.
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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-04-2019, 03:25 PM
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But I was just trying to see what nets people prefer when I posted this. Rob
C'mon, this is speypages. Patience. End of page two, beginning of page three someone will probably address your original question.

(I picked up a beautiful Rushton net, but have yet had a chance to use it, as it will ride in a boat. I walk in at this point.)

Last edited by SLSS; 12-04-2019 at 06:47 PM.
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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-04-2019, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by RobP View Post
What convinced me to use a net was articles written by biologist about the stress the fish under goes when playing it to exhaustion. During a prolonged fight a fish builds up lactic acid in its system, that and the stress can prove to be fatal even though it swims off seemingly unharmed. But I was just trying to see what nets people prefer when I posted this. Rob
If it is taking too long to get the fish in, I'll drop the rod and hand line to fish in, grab the hook with pliers and let it go.
Sometimes the fish may break off with a hook in the mouth, but they get rid of those pretty quick.
No need to play them to exhaustion.
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post #11 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-04-2019, 04:12 PM
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If I'm fishing in a strong flow & not wading with the net but sticking it into the bank in the lower half of the pool & fishing down to it, then I used a Sharpe's 24" diameter Gye net with a deep knitted (knotless) net.

If I'm wading I use a 24" diameter flick up net with an extending handle made by Whitlock; this was pricey but is good & I fitted a clip to the handle so it fits on the D ring on the back of my wading jacket at the base of my neck & just hangs down my back out of the way until needed. Again it is fitted with the deep knitted mesh which is easy on the fish & a fairly small mesh size so it doesn't split fins etc.

Regards, Tyke.
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post #12 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-04-2019, 04:38 PM
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I fish alone and tail the fish. I have seen fish damaged in nets so donít use one.
I only use net with rubber ( fishnet brand) for Alaskan Rainbows and a rubber does very little if any damage to fish. This one is about 34" long with 22x14" hoop. Also very useful as a back support



https://i.imgur.com/TkdtuFv.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/xJ4aaSC.jpg
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post #13 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-04-2019, 09:40 PM
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I have thought about this, but what do you do when the fish is played out. My concern is when slipping the hook, the fish swims off when it may not be fully recovered. Iím really thinking summer fish where water temps are warmer.
These fish are pretty freaking streamlined and able to find lies where they exert little to no effort to stay there. Those are they places we find them. Usually after I remove the hook the fish will slowly meander back out into the current and find it's own place to recover...I'm sure it knows what it needs better than I do. Sometimes a fish may need to be righted before it moves off. Sometime they just sit there for a minute or so. All this non-handling of the fish has to be less of a freakout than being encased in a net or handled by the tail for a few minutes while you are letting it "recover"...in warm shallow and less oxygenated water than where it took your fly.

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What convinced me to use a net was articles written by biologist about the stress the fish under goes when playing it to exhaustion. During a prolonged fight a fish builds up lactic acid in its system, that and the stress can prove to be fatal even though it swims off seemingly unharmed.
If the encounter is going to be fatal, does it matter if it swims off after being "revived" or netted or after it is quickly unhooked? Dead is dead. I've seen one die before it could be brought to hand, and it was not a long drawn out affair either.

After breaking a spey rod trying to release one in knee deep water, I've taken to throwing them some slack line when I've got them close and hoping they come off by themselves. This can save a couple minutes of the struggle and help reduce stress. Surprisingly, it seems to work about half the time. I will try to land one of those one in a season/seasons fish to get a look at it. But usually I go for the SDR, short distance release or a quick pluck of the hook. Nobody gets hurt and no rods get broke.
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post #14 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-04-2019, 10:06 PM
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Rob P, to stick to your question, I use this:
https://fishpondusa.com/nomad-mid-length-boat-net

Similar you your net and I also sling it off my sling pack. But its carbon fiber, so very very light!

Cheers!



Quote:
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When fishing solo I use this Brodin net it is 14 1/2" x 19" opening and is 33" overall. I clip it to the ring on the back of my wading jacket with a magnetic release, works great. I'd be interested in what others use when wading and fishing alone. Or if they just tail the fish?

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