Double Tapered Spey lines - Spey Pages
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post #1 of 23 (permalink) Old 11-12-2019, 01:40 PM Thread Starter
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Double Tapered Spey lines

I've heard over and over how difficult and unforgiving DT lines can be on two handed rods. I seem to be a glutton for punishment and I'm interested in picking one up, however, I'm not really sure where to start.

Does anyone have a recommendation for a DT spey line? Any tips or experiences you could share? I'd welcome any discussion about it.

Or heck, if you've got one sitting around in your closet gathering dust, send me a message and lets get it on the water.

For context, I'm planning on using the DT line on an Echo DH II 7130.

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post #2 of 23 (permalink) Old 11-12-2019, 02:25 PM
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there is nothing wrong with DT's they are great if you are young and have the body healthy enough to move that amount of line. i don't think they are difficult to cast. They will however make you a better caster.
a couple tips

1. about your anchor.. think of it in terms of wanting to kiss the water with your line. you want it to land softly with little splash

2. power comes from both hands

3. full body movements not just your arms


enjoy not stripping line as much

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post #3 of 23 (permalink) Old 11-12-2019, 02:56 PM
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Modern Spey taper is easier to Spey cast because there comes more line mass to the top of the D-loop when longer length of line head is cast. It is also possible to lengthen the cast more when thin running/shooting line waste less cast energy than thick and heavy DT belly.

DT line is good material for overhead casting shooting heads.

Esa
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post #4 of 23 (permalink) Old 11-12-2019, 10:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coalbe View Post
I've heard over and over how difficult and unforgiving DT lines can be on two handed rods. I seem to be a glutton for punishment and I'm interested in picking one up, however, I'm not really sure where to start.

Does anyone have a recommendation for a DT spey line? Any tips or experiences you could share? I'd welcome any discussion about it.

Or heck, if you've got one sitting around in your closet gathering dust, send me a message and lets get it on the water.

For context, I'm planning on using the DT line on an Echo DH II 7130.

You might try a Cortland 444 Lazer DT 7, 8 or even a 9F for that rod. I cast an 8wt with a Sage 7136 GIII which is the closest match I have to a DH. Roughly 680 grains ( weighed) and 30 yds. I'll have to measure it out for the exact length since it was used when I purchased and may have been docked. I can handle 50 - 55 feet beyond the tip eighth at rod, a 15' leader and unweighted flies. So it is comparable to various short-belly WF in 5/6/7 weight-class. It does not shoot like a WF - but four or five strips maybe a little more when casting over-head. A 9wt (heavier) would be a tad easier. Also, greater distance with the same and a longer TH'er - if you have one.

Minimal anchor - Large Dloop is the way to go.

Last edited by fish0n4evr; 11-13-2019 at 02:26 AM.
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post #5 of 23 (permalink) Old 11-13-2019, 01:40 PM
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Here is a thread I started a while back discussing some characteristics of the DT line - https://www.speypages.com/speyclave/...ng-rod-dt.html

Yes, DT's can be more difficult than other line styles, however they are not impossible to manage.
They are a great tool for tuning casting since they are less forgiving than other line styles and in the same breath I will say, they are a very flexible fishing tool


Mike

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post #6 of 23 (permalink) Old 11-13-2019, 04:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coalbe View Post
I've heard over and over how difficult and unforgiving DT lines can be on two handed rods. I seem to be a glutton for punishment and I'm interested in picking one up, however, I'm not really sure where to start.

Does anyone have a recommendation for a DT spey line? Any tips or experiences you could share? I'd welcome any discussion about it.

Or heck, if you've got one sitting around in your closet gathering dust, send me a message and lets get it on the water.

For context, I'm planning on using the DT line on an Echo DH II 7130.
Choose a DT ( 8, 9,10 DT) depending on how/what you want to cast. Match-up doesn't have to be exact since it is likely that you will not have the entire length beyond the tip-top. Like Trey Combs advises: Cut the level tip sections, roughly 1 foot from one end and attach your leader.

I leave the other end intact and attach the backing with a nail-knot. Loops are convenient too. Either way - I'm using the same line on different rods.
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post #7 of 23 (permalink) Old 11-13-2019, 06:15 PM
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Is that the general consensus with DT lines, 1>3 weights up? The rods mentioned, 13' and 13'6", I would think DT's are better suited on 15'+ rods??? Never tried it and am curious.

Dan

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post #8 of 23 (permalink) Old 11-13-2019, 06:38 PM
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Just a point of order really. DT lines aren't specifically Spey lines, they're merely a Double Taper line, thats all, nowt special, nothing fancy.Yes its a fairly good consideration they should be longer than a Std. Trout DT line as simply you'll be able to lift more and therefore cast more with a longer double handed rod.
Its all down to you the casting of them, as you lengthen line you WILL need a longer slower stroke!.Longer more powerful rods will help no end.
Just because your rod says 9 on it dosen't mean you'll be able to cast all of a 9 line!.
Wether you like it or not, there will be a length of say 9 weight line you'll cast fairly comfortably and easily, here's the blinded by the light bit!,you'll cast a shorter length of 10 line or a longer length of 8 weight just as easily!, up to a point.The skill lays in managing and casting longer lengths of line!
What will knock you for 6 are conditions, depth of wade, wind direction and strength and bankside obstructions behind and about you.
The idea behind a DT line is once you find a weight and length of line that works for you and your rod, you stick to that length, shooting only the few yds you draw in to entice a following fish at the end of each cast, you simply lift, re anchor and roll it all out shooting the few yds you've stripped in each time.Unless you're crap at it, it'll be a LOT more line than a Head of just about any type and indeed a long bellied Spey line.
Get settled and into a groove and you can cover some serious water quite effectively.
Once you get that mastered, then move onto sinking lines and weighted flee's!.Get that bit sorted and give yourself a pat on the back!.
Tip for you in starting?, try a line size one weight up, it'll load your rod quicker and easier from the off, but you won't get outright distance.Once you settle into it all then try a line size one down and see how you go.
Lots of luck with it all,Yorkie.
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post #9 of 23 (permalink) Old 11-13-2019, 06:53 PM
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For my applications, I do not fish rods shorter than 14ft with DT's. Doesn't mean it can't be done though.
Typically I use UK rated Salmon DT's. These lines are not the trout models that are 90ft long. The UK rated lines are 105ft and 120ft.
However, you could step up three line weights in the trout models to achieve grains necessary for loading the two-handed rods.
So a 7wt "Spey" rated rod like the OP's 7130, possibly a good match would be a DT10 single hand rating. Personal taste in loading would dictate preferences.

On my Meiser 14ft Highlander 7/8/9 EVE, I use a Worcestershire Salmon DT10 - UK rated lines are typically one line weight less than N.American ratings. So the line would be considered a DT9 N.American.
On my Meiser 15ft 8/9/10 Highlander a Worcestershire Salmon DT11 is the "BOMB" !! It will handle up to the rear tip section in the guides and the rest of the line aerialized


Mike
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post #10 of 23 (permalink) Old 11-13-2019, 07:19 PM
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In my mind the whole point of a DT (or Carron type long belly) is in the fishing not casting.
You can cast what you can which will, of course, improve with practice.

However the fishing benefit is with one single Spey cast your fly is back in the water fishing.
No delays stripping in running line, repositioning a Skagit head etc.
Youíll find your fly will be in the water fishing almost twice the time.
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post #11 of 23 (permalink) Old 11-13-2019, 07:35 PM
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Until recently and for the last couple months I have been fishing a Wulff 9/10 spey(Mike's hand me down). I believe the head is ~80ft. I fish it with the complete head out plus a few feet and don't really shoot much line as there isn't much left on the reel and I really don't need to. What sort of adjustments could one expect when transitioning to a DT? Larger, more open loop? Slower stroke? etc.....

Dan

Note: The Wulff line is quite easy to cast. Even short. Fair bit tougher with a sinking poly but that will come with practice.

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post #12 of 23 (permalink) Old 11-13-2019, 07:37 PM
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Is that the general consensus with DT lines, 1>3 weights up? The rods mentioned, 13' and 13'6", I would think DT's are better suited on 15'+ rods??? Never tried it and am curious.

Dan


find a DT spey line often called a "Salmon" DT not a standard DT
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post #13 of 23 (permalink) Old 11-14-2019, 12:12 AM
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Is that the general consensus with DT lines, 1>3 weights up? The rods mentioned, 13' and 13'6", I would think DT's are better suited on 15'+ rods??? Never tried it and am curious.

Dan
I owned a Dec Hogan 7130.

Some guidelines to consider when selecting a DT for any given rod are the length of the rod versus length and weight versus personal limitations.

Going from my experience - a Cortland 444 7,8,9 DT on the DH7130 would be a good matches to the rod, maybe even a 10 weight with roughly 50 feet beyond tip-top.. For me any more length and it will become more work and less play with only a 13 footer. Those lines are 90 feet on average.

But not all DTs are the same. Of the two Cortland 444 DT's I current own - one is 8w mentioned earlier. The other, a "Salmon DT" is 120 feet and 1020 grain.

One other which shipped from Inverness UK spooled in a 3 3/4 Bougle is only 550 grains, 65 feet transitioning into 12 foot sinking sections on each end. I'll cast it 10 to 12 foot rods.

I've owned GPS 7/8/9 and 9/10/11W DT, which are at least 115 feet, 1080 and 1200 grain respectively.
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post #14 of 23 (permalink) Old 11-14-2019, 08:34 AM
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If any of you want the longer length of Salmon DT lines, give me a PM as like as not I can pass details on of sources here in the UK.Most of the big on line dealers will post/deliver/courier abroad.There's still 35yd and 40yd Dt lines "floating" about and as like as not I'll have a rough idea of what you may well want.
Cheers, Yorkie.
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post #15 of 23 (permalink) Old 11-14-2019, 10:11 AM
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I for one would be happy to hear of sources for these salmon DTs.

Nowadays it can be challenging to find a reel with enough volume for truly long heads.

Like an unconscious answer to a question that has been troubling me for long, or a sudden opportunity to achieve something valuable I had almost given up on, the fish is there.
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