Integrated Line repair - Spey Pages
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post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-26-2019, 03:56 PM Thread Starter
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Integrated Line repair

I have a coating separation at the running line/head junction on a Scandi line needing repair. I am considering sliding a piece of heat shrink over it to repair the separation. Don't really want to create a loop/loop situation. Any advise on a better idea?

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post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-26-2019, 05:36 PM
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Heat shrink will cause a weak spot on either side of the tubing. Easiest is some aqua seal, still flexible and you can always add more where needed
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post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-26-2019, 07:34 PM
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Find thin braided hallow line and use it as a sleeve. Then coat with a flexible glue.
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post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-27-2019, 01:16 AM
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Let me guess: Polyurethane.
I"m not "joshing" you as it is fairly common with PU coatings.

My preferred method, with the best possible outcome is to simply cut out the separated sectioned and do a blind-splice. You will be left with with two remain sections. Strip the coating, preferably from the running line (the thinner ) section leaving a "working" section of the core exposed. Use a needle to separate and to unravel the fibres of the core material so that it will pass through the needle-eye. And I've done this successfully with a sewing needle! The needle will then be pushed as far as possible into the core of the good remaining section of the line. Hemostats are especially useful so that you don't prick your self doing this. A half inch into the good core is enough; Any more is only better. Push the needle out through the coating of the remaining section being joined on-to so that the cores of each section are over-lapping for a super secure core-to-core splice. Soak each section with isopropyl-alcohol so that everything is clean to ensure a secure bond and allow to air-dry for a few minutes. After having pulled the exposed core into and out one side [of section being joined onto] coat the exposed core with Aquaseal (or similar sealant ) and clamp hemostats to the tag-end of the core to prevent it from slipping back through as you work, back and forth, the sealant into the core of the flyline. Work it well into the core. Gloves are very helpful for this. Once you are satisfied the sealant has been forced into the core, simply join the coatings of each section against one another and carefully wipe any excess sealant using isopropyl-alcohol and clan rags. Allow to dry to "tack free" and clip the tag-end for a smooth connection. Allow to dry overnight/24 hours. You might like to coat the splice with sealant, but it is not necessary. Next day you can pull and tug on the splice to see that IT IS secure.
PVC coatings and/or mix-matched coatings and core: Does not matter, with the exception of mono-cores.
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post #5 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-27-2019, 08:21 AM
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Hello.. The most simple way of repairing a coating only should be a bottle of Loctite 414. It is not a strength question, just to put the coating back? At least on PVC lines, the bond is silly strong. Smear your fingers to work with, using candle wax. This will prevent you to glue your fingers. Angle away the split coating part to be glued, apply glue to maybe 1/4", and press together. Repeat until done. I used the 414 to put an old RIO integrated Skagit to use, beer can style. Untapered in the front end rendered it be pretty useless, and also head is too long. I cut the front 2― yards away, replaced with a tapered tip from an old, useless SA Skagit head, aiming for a head of about 23ī. Weliding didnīt work, so much plastic to weld that the joint was overheated and snapped. Removing the coating ad splicing didnīt work, too much plastic for the needle to move. So, for the first time, I tested a 414 splice. Using a Dremel tool, I removed the coating on about 3", making the square section halfmoon shaped on both lines. Candlewax on fingers and bring on the glue. First time, so not very neat. But strong. Head turned out to be 22ī8", front end to colour change. On with a 15īT-14 tip, down to river, testing. Just over 100ī, dead straight line. Method copied from "How to design flylines", but author Al Buhr coats the joint with floss silk and Aquasure, but that would make my splice extremely thick. Iīll try to use it this way, letīs see of it stands up for some fishing.. Yours borano20
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Last edited by borano20; 10-27-2019 at 08:59 AM.
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post #6 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-27-2019, 11:31 AM
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Until recently the only flexible Loctite was 4581, but less flexible than Aquaseal. My favorite when building flies.

https://www.henkel-adhesives.com/us/...tite_4851.html

Recently, Henkel has intruded very flexible Loctice, ( Loctite 4902FL Highly Flexible Cyanoacrylate)


https://www.henkel-adhesives.com/us/...e_4902_fl.html

A very inexpensive adhesive, which is a bit harder then Aquaseal, and has flexibility vey similar to PVC or PU is Loon UV gel. Make sure you clean surface with at least 70% Isoproplyl alcohol ( rubbing alcohol ) and expose glue to a good sun for few hours. The glue won't be sticky very quickly, but the full polymerization requires more sun exposure.
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post #7 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-27-2019, 12:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fish0n4evr View Post
Let me guess: Polyurethane.
I"m not "joshing" you as it is fairly common with PU coatings.

My preferred method, with the best possible outcome is to simply cut out the separated sectioned and do a blind-splice. You will be left with with two remain sections. Strip the coating, preferably from the running line (the thinner ) section leaving a "working" section of the core exposed. Use a needle to separate and to unravel the fibres of the core material so that it will pass through the needle-eye. And I've done this successfully with a sewing needle! The needle will then be pushed as far as possible into the core of the good remaining section of the line. Hemostats are especially useful so that you don't prick your self doing this. A half inch into the good core is enough; Any more is only better. Push the needle out through the coating of the remaining section being joined on-to so that the cores of each section are over-lapping for a super secure core-to-core splice. Soak each section with isopropyl-alcohol so that everything is clean to ensure a secure bond and allow to air-dry for a few minutes. After having pulled the exposed core into and out one side [of section being joined onto] coat the exposed core with Aquaseal (or similar sealant ) and clamp hemostats to the tag-end of the core to prevent it from slipping back through as you work, back and forth, the sealant into the core of the flyline. Work it well into the core. Gloves are very helpful for this. Once you are satisfied the sealant has been forced into the core, simply join the coatings of each section against one another and carefully wipe any excess sealant using isopropyl-alcohol and clan rags. Allow to dry to "tack free" and clip the tag-end for a smooth connection. Allow to dry overnight/24 hours. You might like to coat the splice with sealant, but it is not necessary. Next day you can pull and tug on the splice to see that IT IS secure.
PVC coatings and/or mix-matched coatings and core: Does not matter, with the exception of mono-cores.
Some of the cores in the newer lines do not lend themselves to the blind splice. Can't get a needle in them and they are not "braided" like the older cores so they won't grip the inserted core.

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post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-27-2019, 12:32 PM
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Pretty expensive
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post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-27-2019, 01:01 PM
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OK, where can you purchase a small bottle? I don't need a 20 oz or 1 lb bottle of the stuff
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post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-27-2019, 01:22 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks much for the various options to explore, and advise on not using heat shrink.
Relative to Loctite it appears that 4902 and 4902 FL have the same specs with the FL standing for fluorescent. Also saw it priced between $50 and $60. Still expensive for a one time (maybe not) repair.
Jim

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post #11 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-27-2019, 01:42 PM
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OK, where can you purchase a small bottle? I don't need a 20 oz or 1 lb bottle of the stuff


That is for 20 grams
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post #12 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-27-2019, 01:51 PM
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Hello.. A 3 gram bottle of 414 will set you back about a tenner... Yours borano20
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post #13 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-27-2019, 02:40 PM
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I have joined lines using needle method, welding and braid. Using needle pulling core inside other core makes smooth join but often it is difficult and sometimes cores just do not co-operate. Welding works very good only with PU coated lines.

Best method for me is gluing and thread wrapping. When I join thin shooting line to thick shooting head I splice head coating to two "flaps" which thin towards ends. Then I tie cores using reef knot adding PU glue. Then I cut core ends to 1/4" and fray 1/8". Then I tape shooting head to table so that join comes about an inch out. I put more PU and first wrap over the reef knot and then over flaps keeping thread saturated with PU glue. Then finish using five half hitch which is trickiest phase in process. Then smooth the PU and let dry overnight. When thin shooting line stay between flaps there does not come too stiff "breaking point" and this join lasts long.

Esa
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post #14 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-27-2019, 06:42 PM
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Quote:
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That is for 20 grams
20 g, 0.7 oz cost $ 54

https://www.amazon.com/Loctite-18758...2211869&sr=8-2

Look at the bottle. There is an error in the title , it should said 20 g and 0.7 oz

Moderately flexible 4851 cost on Amazon $ 24 for 20 g ( 0.7 oz.)
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post #15 of 24 (permalink) Old 10-27-2019, 07:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bender View Post
I have joined lines using needle method, welding and braid. Using needle pulling core inside other core makes smooth join but often it is difficult and sometimes cores just do not co-operate. Welding works very good only with PU coated lines.

Best method for me is gluing and thread wrapping. When I join thin shooting line to thick shooting head I splice head coating to two "flaps" which thin towards ends. Then I tie cores using reef knot adding PU glue. Then I cut core ends to 1/4" and fray 1/8". Then I tape shooting head to table so that join comes about an inch out. I put more PU and first wrap over the reef knot and then over flaps keeping thread saturated with PU glue. Then finish using five half hitch which is trickiest phase in process. Then smooth the PU and let dry overnight. When thin shooting line stay between flaps there does not come too stiff "breaking point" and this join lasts long.

Esa
It would be nice if you could provide a step by step,(with pictures) of this method!

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