Gears for Gaula River? - Spey Pages
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post #1 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-04-2019, 01:17 PM Thread Starter
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Gears for Gaula River?

So we are planning to fish the Guala River of Norway next year in June. I have about a year time to prepare. What gears are needed for those who have fished there?

I did a quick research and the online articles suggest spey rods of 9/10wt, 14~15ft. Big guns! While a friend of mine recently caught his first Salmon there on a 7130.

Currently my heaviest spey rod is the TCX 7126. Do you think I m undergunned and better get another 9140 or 10150 outfit? I won't have much uses for such big gun locally so it's probably only for the trip (or future trips if I decide to visit there again!)

As for the reel and line....drag or click pawl reel? Skagit, Scandi or traditional longer belly line?

Thanks
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post #2 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-04-2019, 03:49 PM
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While that 7126 will handle the average fish, I tend to use gear for the exception. As in there are some truly giant salmon in that river and would use nothing less than a 9wt with a good/ stout disk drag reel. Nothing worse than overplaying a fish you intend to release, there is 40# + fish landed there every year. The rest, fish how you like but scandi is most common but it is a big river and long cast are helpfull in some runs. How you deliver the fly is open to all interpretations.
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post #3 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-04-2019, 06:38 PM
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I just spent a week in Norway fishing a river of similar size to the Gaula and not too far away. I took a variety of rods but found myself fishing the 15ft 10 wt with a scandi line most. Big river, big fish, big rod
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post #4 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-04-2019, 06:50 PM
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Big river big fish means big gear. Why go to the expense of traveling to a special river, be fortunate enough to hook a large fish, then destroy the fish because you used small fish gear. Respect the fish and the river you’re fishing.
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post #5 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-04-2019, 08:48 PM
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I have that same rod 7126 TCX and have it paired with a Bogdan Model 2. I have landed Chinook up to 35 lbs and Atlantic Salmon to 20lbs with this setup with no problems. I think you would be fine with this rod as long as you have a good reel with a good drag to use with it.
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post #6 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-04-2019, 08:53 PM
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Go prepared!
Depending on the beat you are planning to fish. Seek advice from the owner or outfitter of the beat/s.
Beats on the lower stretches of the river, early season: 14/15/16 ft rods in 9-10-11-12 wt. Big discdrag reel with a selection of full sink lines. Scandi is the norm.
Upper part of river late season: 12-13/14/15 ft in 8-9-10 wt. A versitip floater + a few full sinkers.
As pointed out by the others, Big river Big fish Big guns.
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post #7 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-04-2019, 10:14 PM
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Originally Posted by john8 View Post
I have that same rod 7126 TCX and have it paired with a Bogdan Model 2. I have landed Chinook up to 35 lbs and Atlantic Salmon to 20lbs with this setup with no problems. I think you would be fine with this rod as long as you have a good reel with a good drag to use with it.
Depending on the water, you could probably use the TCX 7126 to kill Atlantic salmon larger than 15 kg..... but the problem with northern Norwegian mainstems as I understand it, is that they are large, narrow and fast. A stouter rod might be in order.



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post #8 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-04-2019, 11:37 PM
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I think for fish fighting and 8/9 weight it probably ok even in some of the faster runs, but i found i used my 10/11 rods most in medium/high flows cause the heavier lines made casting big heavy flies easier.

You dont see many guys with plain clicker reels on that river.
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post #9 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-05-2019, 01:04 AM
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Originally Posted by john8 View Post
I have that same rod 7126 TCX and have it paired with a Bogdan Model 2. I have landed Chinook up to 35 lbs and Atlantic Salmon to 20lbs with this setup with no problems. I think you would be fine with this rod as long as you have a good reel with a good drag to use with it.
I don't agree anyone should be using a 7 weight rod when there is a chance of fish in the 40 pound range. Or less.
Simply not a good idea. My 2 cents.
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post #10 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-05-2019, 02:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john8 View Post
I have that same rod 7126 TCX and have it paired with a Bogdan Model 2. I have landed Chinook up to 35 lbs and Atlantic Salmon to 20lbs with this setup with no problems. I think you would be fine with this rod as long as you have a good reel with a good drag to use with it.
Im certainly not saying its impossible to quickly land and release a 35 lb Chinook with a 7 wt 126 rod, as you have done it.
However in my experience a 35 lb Chinook heading downstream in a strong current is going to overpower that 7 wt. rod in a heartbeat.
Sure you can play the fish on the reel drag but the rod will be next to useless in helping to bring the fish in quickly.
Almost guaranteed a large salmon on a small rod will have fatal lactic acid buildup and die.
Why risk that at a time when fish numbers are dropping so much?
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post #11 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-05-2019, 04:13 AM
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I was there for the opening (June 1), in principle at the beginning of the season there is plenty of water and cold so big flies and lines S7 / 8! a minimum of 14 'is recommended; it is not the size of the fish that is involved but the ease of fishing in this configuration.
Then the lighter rods are perfect for fine peaches.

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post #12 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-05-2019, 09:27 AM
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Living approximately 40min from Gaula river.

I am not expert to say what you should use there but everything depends how much there’s water.

If its 200-400 cubics you might have some troubles with #7 rod.
Under 100cubs and you can easily go with heavier single hand , switch rod or some shorter spey rod.

Last year I was mostly fishing there with single hand #8 rod when the water level was low, didn’t caught any huge ones but 10kg landed and released with single hand pretty quickly.

I was just fishing upper Gaula with single hand when water level was quite normal, no problems there where river is not so wide.

But let’s say :
14-15footer for high water conditions & S4-S6+ sink lines /tips
Low water conditions 11-13ft /single hand #7-9 ,Float, intermediate, S1/S2/S3 heads/tips
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post #13 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-05-2019, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by jdcross View Post
Im certainly not saying its impossible to quickly land and release a 35 lb Chinook with a 7 wt 126 rod, as you have done it.
However in my experience a 35 lb Chinook heading downstream in a strong current is going to overpower that 7 wt. rod in a heartbeat.
......

Let's not get carried away here. A little historical perspective if I may.

Once upon a time, some of us used saltwater 9 weight and 10 weight single handers to fish Chinook.

Believe me, the TCX 7126 (really an 8 wt, not a 7 wt) has just as much lifting power as those 9 and 10 weight saltwater single handers. If not more.

Besides it is slightly easier to run at top speed on cobble bars with a lighter rod!



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post #14 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-05-2019, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by ENSO View Post
Let's not get carried away here. A little historical perspective if I may.
Once upon a time, some of us used saltwater 9 weight and 10 weight single handers to fish Chinook.
Believe me, the TCX 7126 (really an 8 wt, not a 7 wt) has just as much lifting power as those 9 and 10 weight saltwater single handers. If not more.
Besides it is slightly easier to run at top speed on cobble bars with a lighter rod!
Yes let's add some historical perspective.

Back when the world fly fished for big fish in rivers with single handed rods there was lots of fish in the rivers, you could kill fish, and few worried about how long it took to land a fish, particularly if you were going to kill it.
So a big Chinook on an fly rod was all about the size of the fish and length of the fight.

Those days are gone.

Today it's about being fortunate enough to fish in a river that holds fish, being fortunate enough to catch one, and having the equipment to land it quickly and safely so it can have a good chance of recovering and spawning.

The least we can do is make sure our equipment is up to meeting the demands of today's fishing realities
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post #15 of 46 (permalink) Old 07-05-2019, 03:08 PM
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You have a year to acquire the proper tools for the trip. Put the feelers out, set up searches. Buy a used rod & reel & if need be, spring for a new line & backing. When you no longer need it, unload it for what you can get out of it.
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