Trout Spey - Spey Pages
 17Likes
  • 1 Post By raspberry-patch
  • 5 Post By Captcaveman
  • 4 Post By bocast
  • 1 Post By Captcaveman
  • 2 Post By swingndeep
  • 2 Post By Randyflycaster
  • 2 Post By Skyler76
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 12-21-2019, 11:34 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Daniel King's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 11
Trout Spey

Hello y’all
I am just getting into the Spey game and What’s a good trout Spey set-up for a beginner spey caster?
Line types?
Rods?
Reels?
Any good YouTube channels to watch that would help to

Cheers
Daniel King is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 12-21-2019, 01:58 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Montana
Posts: 521
Depends on ur budget...ur local fly shops may help u make that decision depending on what brands they have on hand to demo. There's some great trouters out now a days
chief_n8dub is offline  
post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 12-21-2019, 04:37 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Eastern Ontario
Posts: 1,618
Agreed with it depends --- also on the water, what type of flies you want to through, et cetera. I myself prefer longer rods and enable larger water and focus on two rods:

ACR 1173 if I am dealing with smaller wet flies, et cetera using the RIO line provided by ACR on an old used Harrdy St Aidan Reel.

Meiser 12'6" 4 with a 311 Grain SGS line for larger streamers or smaller also on a more than required Nautilus CCF 8.

If I travel, I have a Meiser 13'0 5 5piece for trout, a few custom James Green fiberglass 10'.


More important is getting some instruction and help, to learn the motion, the feel, and getting practice.
Tyson likes this.
raspberry-patch is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 12-22-2019, 12:00 AM
Registered User
 
Captcaveman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 234
I've got a Redington Hydrogen 3113. It's the only trout spey I own, and it hasn't disappointed me. It's very light in hand. It can do soft hackle or moderate streamer duty just fine. It has handled trout to 18" for me without a problem.

The shop I ordered it from sold me a #4 305 grain Rio Trout Spey Head, and a 240 Scandi Short for the rod. Both of these heads will cast, but they're above Redington's respective scandi and skagit grain windows for the Hydrogen 3113. I'm guessing they sent me these assuming I was a rank beginner and needed a heavy head to help me feel the rod load. Unfortunately I did not. If you're interested in this particular rod I suggest you stay within Redington's recommended grain windows, this rod has plenty of feel without going overweight on heads. IMO overweight heads bog this rod down and make any finesse during the cast harder to achieve.

I have since replaced the #4 305 grain Trout Spey Head with a #3 265 grain Rio Trout Spey integrated line (the scandi-ish one, not the skagit one). I use anything from 7' Trout Versileaders to 10' Light Scandi Versileaders with it. Throws anything from small skaters and wets to #4 heavy wire spey/dee flies. This rod and line allows the use of touch-and- go or sustained anchor casts. If I could only have one line for the rod, this would be it. Very versatile. When used with Versileaders, the line system retains some of the grace of a scandi head while having enough weight in the head to still haul some mail.

The Rio Scandi Short 240, with 11'+ mono leaders, works for dry/damp flies and I use it as soon as conditions allow, it is still a little heavy for the scandi grain window however. I plan to replace it with the 210 grain version soon. If your fishing allows it, I suggest you try a full floating scandi. When you find the one that matches your rod and casting stroke, it's pure bliss. If I could fish a full floating scandi head year round (some do, just not me yet) I would.

If you need to fish huge or heavy weighted flies or need to use T-material for depth, choose a skagit head. I have no suggestion for these heads as I don't use them on this rod, but there is plenty of info on these elsewhere here on SP.

Any reel from 6.5oz to 7.5oz empty should balance this rod fine. I have a Pflueger New Medalist 7/8 on mine. It balances fine, and has way more backing capacity that a person should need on a 3wt trout spey.

If you do not choose an integrated line, I would encourage you to steer clear of mono running lines as a beginner. A coated shooting line will still get you reasonable distance with the added benefits of less tangles, and increased ability to mend. As a beginner your priority should be making good contolled casts, distance will come in short order. Chucking huge distance does you no good unless you can maintain control of the swing. My order of preference is integrated line first (no loop to loop connections ticking in the rod guides), coated shooting line second (if you don't mind the loop to loop), and mono last (most distance, but least mend-ability).

If you've got knowledgeable spey shops near you or friends that will let you demo some rods and lines, you should take advantage of the resource (this is something I didn't have ready access to). The only way to know if a given rod and line is going to work for you is to go cast it... preferably with someone experienced there that can help you make the right decisions. Using these resources before buying can save you alot of time, money, and headache.

Hope this helps and good luck!

-Sean
Captcaveman is online now  
post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 12-25-2019, 10:45 AM
newcomer to spey casting
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Penns Creek
Posts: 153
Captcaveman's advice is stellar. Here are some pricier rod choices from mid to high priced:

Loomis IMX Pro Trout Spey 11'11" in 3 wt, a mid priced rod which competes favorably in the very top tier of rods. It's a solid performer and great against a wind, btw.

Sage ONE trout Spey which is an older model previously referred to as a switch rod. This is a high end rod which may be available on a discount until it sells out. Its fast action unlocks line speed and distance as you develop casting technique. The 4 wt was once described by Simon Gawesworth as his favorite spey rod. It can easily handle fish up to eight pounds. The three weight might be better for most trout applications in the lower 48, handling fish up to six pounds easily. It is a good rod for someone who likes a tight, snappy cast and casting for distance. As Captcaveman well described, distance is not nearly as important as presentation, but we all like to be able to reach out and touch a distant seam...

I'm not sure how the new Sage Trout Spey HD compares head to head with the Sage ONE.

Winston BIII TH Micro-spey Pricey but my very favorite rod of all time. It was an expensive anniversary present from my wife. I got the 4 wt because I wanted to throw smallmouth-sized streamers and poppers on my home waters in the Midwest and also because I planned to use it on the North Platte in Wyoming where the four weight seems a better match than a three weight. On very windy days in Wyoming, a Loomis IMX Pro Trout Spey or the Sage ONE Trout Spey will likely have an edge over the Winston, because the Winston is smooth and soulful but not necessarily the ultimate in distance. I love fishing central PA streams with teams of soft hackles and small streamers. The Winston BIII TH Micro-spey 4 wt is my dream two handed rod. With lots of advice I got on this forum especially the tip of watching my D loop to find faults, I love casting this rod at all distances up to about 80 feet. I use the Rio Trout Spey head in 305 grains and SA Sonar poly leaders for soft hackle work and for small to mid sized streamers. I use a 250 gr or 300 gr Commando head and iMOW tips for larger flies. I also use the Commando Groove 1 inch per second sink head. I plan to use the Rio Game Changer Float/Hover/Intermediate head at 350 grains ( lightest Game Changer offered) when water depth is appropriate. I also use and love the Rio Scandi Short Versitip first off in the 5 wt (320 gr) but more recently in the 4 wt (275 grain). As I improve my casting, I find myself gravitating to lighter grain weight heads. Reels used are Sage Trout Spey (nice reel) with a spare spool and also the new Pfleuger Medalist 7/8 of which I have two to switch setups. The Pfleuger is a solid reel that I enjoy.

I have cast all the rods above. Take my advice with a grain of salt as I still consider myself a beginner with more casting faults than casting strengths. One rod which I haven't cast but seems very promising is the new Beulah G2 platinum trout Spey rod in 12'0" 3 wt. That might be a very sweet rod, but there's no way to know without casting it.

As you can tell, investing in lines and tips as skill level increases and for special applications is part of the two handed casting journey. An accountant reading this post with a price list in hand will tell you that I spend way too much on gear. My wife and I love it. It's best to get one good setup and fish the hell out of it. Great trout Spey is accessible to a variety of budgets. Plan accordingly. The relatively inexpensive Redington Hydrogen is not just a good rod; it's a great rod. You could spend on various lines and a reel with extra spools or even multiple Pfleuger Medalist 7/8 reels and still not spend as much as the priciest of the trout Spey rods described above. Casting different rods gives you a choice of action and feel. Take time to learn Spey. Spend some coin on lessons if there is good instruction nearby. Trout Spey is an absolute blast. So is Smallmouth Spey, forcing you to learn completely different presentations. I hope you find the perfect setup, which makes every cast an act of joy and grace.

And Merry Christmas to all.

Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
bocast is offline  
post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 12-26-2019, 09:22 AM
Registered User
 
Captcaveman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 234
Great idea on the Beulah Platinum G2 bocast! If the trout spey actions are anything like my G1 6126, they should be very nice rods! I'd love to try the 4wt for central PA smallies myself!
bocast likes this.

-Sean
Captcaveman is online now  
post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 12-26-2019, 12:10 PM
newcomer to spey casting
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Penns Creek
Posts: 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captcaveman View Post
Great idea on the Beulah Platinum G2 bocast! If the trout spey actions are anything like my G1 6126, they should be very nice rods! I'd love to try the 4wt for central PA smallies myself!
Exactly what I was thinking... what a sweet, capable and light rod that would be!!

Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
bocast is offline  
post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 12-26-2019, 02:27 PM
Registered User
 
swingndeep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Oregon
Posts: 677
If your willing to spend $495 I recommend and own the ACR nova 2 trout spey. Get it in whatever weight your like , it comes with a matched line. pretty sweet casting rod.
Mike
raspberry-patch and bocast like this.


Winters Hope Fly Fishers
swingndeep is online now  
post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 12-27-2019, 01:07 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Daniel King's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by bocast View Post
Captcaveman's advice is stellar. Here are some pricier rod choices from mid to high priced:

Loomis IMX Pro Trout Spey 11'11" in 3 wt, a mid priced rod which competes favorably in the very top tier of rods. It's a solid performer and great against a wind, btw.

Sage ONE trout Spey which is an older model previously referred to as a switch rod. This is a high end rod which may be available on a discount until it sells out. Its fast action unlocks line speed and distance as you develop casting technique. The 4 wt was once described by Simon Gawesworth as his favorite spey rod. It can easily handle fish up to eight pounds. The three weight might be better for most trout applications in the lower 48, handling fish up to six pounds easily. It is a good rod for someone who likes a tight, snappy cast and casting for distance. As Captcaveman well described, distance is not nearly as important as presentation, but we all like to be able to reach out and touch a distant seam...

I'm not sure how the new Sage Trout Spey HD compares head to head with the Sage ONE.

Winston BIII TH Micro-spey Pricey but my very favorite rod of all time. It was an expensive anniversary present from my wife. I got the 4 wt because I wanted to throw smallmouth-sized streamers and poppers on my home waters in the Midwest and also because I planned to use it on the North Platte in Wyoming where the four weight seems a better match than a three weight. On very windy days in Wyoming, a Loomis IMX Pro Trout Spey or the Sage ONE Trout Spey will likely have an edge over the Winston, because the Winston is smooth and soulful but not necessarily the ultimate in distance. I love fishing central PA streams with teams of soft hackles and small streamers. The Winston BIII TH Micro-spey 4 wt is my dream two handed rod. With lots of advice I got on this forum especially the tip of watching my D loop to find faults, I love casting this rod at all distances up to about 80 feet. I use the Rio Trout Spey head in 305 grains and SA Sonar poly leaders for soft hackle work and for small to mid sized streamers. I use a 250 gr or 300 gr Commando head and iMOW tips for larger flies. I also use the Commando Groove 1 inch per second sink head. I plan to use the Rio Game Changer Float/Hover/Intermediate head at 350 grains ( lightest Game Changer offered) when water depth is appropriate. I also use and love the Rio Scandi Short Versitip first off in the 5 wt (320 gr) but more recently in the 4 wt (275 grain). As I improve my casting, I find myself gravitating to lighter grain weight heads. Reels used are Sage Trout Spey (nice reel) with a spare spool and also the new Pfleuger Medalist 7/8 of which I have two to switch setups. The Pfleuger is a solid reel that I enjoy.

I have cast all the rods above. Take my advice with a grain of salt as I still consider myself a beginner with more casting faults than casting strengths. One rod which I haven't cast but seems very promising is the new Beulah G2 platinum trout Spey rod in 12'0" 3 wt. That might be a very sweet rod, but there's no way to know without casting it.

As you can tell, investing in lines and tips as skill level increases and for special applications is part of the two handed casting journey. An accountant reading this post with a price list in hand will tell you that I spend way too much on gear. My wife and I love it. It's best to get one good setup and fish the hell out of it. Great trout Spey is accessible to a variety of budgets. Plan accordingly. The relatively inexpensive Redington Hydrogen is not just a good rod; it's a great rod. You could spend on various lines and a reel with extra spools or even multiple Pfleuger Medalist 7/8 reels and still not spend as much as the priciest of the trout Spey rods described above. Casting different rods gives you a choice of action and feel. Take time to learn Spey. Spend some coin on lessons if there is good instruction nearby. Trout Spey is an absolute blast. So is Smallmouth Spey, forcing you to learn completely different presentations. I hope you find the perfect setup, which makes every cast an act of joy and grace.

And Merry Christmas to all.

Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
Sorry for the late reply!!
Thanks so much for the tricks and tips it really helped and gave me lots to think about.

Cheers
Daniel King is offline  
post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 12-28-2019, 09:04 AM
Registered User
 
Randyflycaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Missoula, MT
Posts: 605
I too would certainly look at the Redington rods. Remember, your first spey rod probably will not be your last. I feel the Redington rods are great rods for the buck. I also like the Okuma SLV reels for the buck. For a 4-weight line, you'll probably want a 7 or 8 size reel. Also, get at least one extra spool.

For lines: if you fish streamers get a Skagit setup, with about 3 different Mow tips. If you fish dries and spiders get a Scandi setup with a versi or a polyleader.

If you're interested in a hybrid line, between Scandi and Skagit, look at the Rage line.

I have many premium rods. To me, my Redington casts just as well.

If you are fishing wide rivers, I believe the longer the spey rod the better.

Randy
Sir Castalot and Tyson like this.
Randyflycaster is offline  
post #11 of 11 (permalink) Old 12-28-2019, 03:32 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 36
I am an Echo fan, I have one of their new "Trout Spey" rods (not the TR2 Trout Spey). It's a nice rod for sure but not your typical Echo price tag. I like to keep trout speys under a 4wt. I feel like the 4wt doesn't feel like a super light spey rod anymore and more just another switch rod.

The redingtons are great and can be had here for super cheap.
https://raftandfly.com/collections/r...-spey-113-demo - it says they're demo'd but my buddy ordered one and received a brand new rod.

Honestly these days I just find myself one hand spey casting with a 5wt instead of a larger trout spey. It's a little more compact for tight waters and allows me to fish a lot of different techniques with the same rod.
Tyson and Beardy Brit like this.

-----
"Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after,Ē Henry David Thoreau.
Skyler76 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Spey Pages forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Linear Mode Linear Mode
Rate This Thread:



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome