Skagit Casting. Slowing Down - Spey Pages
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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 03-11-2017, 11:51 AM Thread Starter
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Skagit Casting. Slowing Down

I've been playing with my Skagit cast lately and working on slowing down.
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... the pseudo-science of running-lines and matching heads has now devolved into such a miasma of obfuscation that it is a wonder that people are even not more confused....Erik Helm

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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 03-11-2017, 05:21 PM
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Good advice, Tim.

Another useful tactic when attempting to slow down involves lining the rod towards the heavier end of the grain window. Since the overall energy (momentum) present in the cast is described by both mass and velocity, distance will not suffer in most circumstances, and the cast will often "feel" more powerful and more forgiving in term of timing.

The heavier (or even more concentrated) weight bends the rod more deeply and the slower tempo it encourages minimizes unwanted anchor movement. Loops are more open, but that is often desirable too, depending on payload.

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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 03-11-2017, 05:54 PM
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Originally Posted by yoda1 View Post
Good advice, Tim.

Another useful tactic when attempting to slow down involves lining the rod towards the heavier end of the grain window. Since the overall energy (momentum) present in the cast is described by both mass and velocity, distance will not suffer in most circumstances, and the cast will often "feel" more powerful and more forgiving in term of timing.

The heavier (or even more concentrated) weight bends the rod more deeply and the slower tempo minimizes unwanted anchor movement. Loops are more open, but that is often desirable too, depending on payload.
Another way to look at it is to go lighter which forces YOU to make the rod bend and is the fastest way to getting better....... if you can have the concentration to watch the rod thru all phases of the cast and see that it is bent...... if you go to fast it won't be..... but if you are slow and deliberate it will be and the gains are measurable when you go to a proper size line for the rod

Bruce Kruk
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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 03-14-2017, 08:10 PM
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Earlier on, I, like most, had a tendency to apply too much speed and power ahead of the rod. I've found slowing down allows the rod to do the work. Given the chance, it's a much better caster than I am.
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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 03-14-2017, 11:07 PM
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Just when I thought I was going slow enough with my Skagit I took out my 70' head for some casting practice. When I put my Skagit and 15' of T17 on to go fishing in the high water pool it was like the afterburner came on. I was feeling and watching the rod more closely and had slowed down even more than usual. Single Spey with a cone head. The great thing is it I was getting tight loops and it was so effortless.

My feeling is the heavier the line the slower and more economical you go. I get it that it is probably better to be accelerating a lighter line but if the heavier setup works so well why not go with it? Having said that I know each cast is like starting over again and this is why I like to cast so much. I can change my mind as fast as each stroke that I make at this point in my learning curve.

Mostly I prefer the lighter side lines but with Nextcast heads I'm tending towards the slightly heavier side especially using sink tips. Tylers suggestions for the CND rods are great and are pretty light. Like most good casters I think he tends towards lighter for fishing. Tommy Aarkvisla is the CND guy in Norway and he seems to suggest one size heavier. How much does technique play into the best line for a rod? Tommy seems to have a very relaxed and economical stroke yet even in slow motion its hard to see his forward stoke it accelerates so fast. I have yet to watch Tyler closely.

I've taken to watching video of distance casting and those that seem to go the furthest seem to cast the easiest yet the rod flex is amazing. Skagit to mid and long belly technique is so very different yet so much the same. Watching the rod is probably the best advise! The more I try to do this the easier everything gets. Every head, sink tip and rod is slightly different.

What was counter intuitive to me at first is that the longer heads need more grain weight. My CND 14'2 likes about 550 grains for a Coastal, 650 grains for a WA45 and 700 to 800 grains for a WA70. I guess its because the weight is spread out over a longer length. I'm still struggling with the lighter side of a 70' head. I find a Carron 65' or the Vector XL easier to cast than the NC 70. It has been suggested to me that especially with the Gen 2 heads it takes a more exacting technique but when it is mastered the NC70 heads are darts. Any comments on this? Guess I just have to keep practicing


Quote:
Originally Posted by fisshman26 View Post
Another way to look at it is to go lighter which forces YOU to make the rod bend and is the fastest way to getting better....... if you can have the concentration to watch the rod thru all phases of the cast and see that it is bent...... if you go to fast it won't be..... but if you are slow and deliberate it will be and the gains are measurable when you go to a proper size line for the rod
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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 03-14-2017, 11:52 PM
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Originally Posted by kdt View Post
Just when I thought I was going slow enough with my Skagit I took out my 70' head for some casting practice. When I put my Skagit and 15' of T17 on to go fishing in the high water pool it was like the afterburner came on. I was feeling and watching the rod more closely and had slowed down even more than usual. Single Spey with a cone head. The great thing is it I was getting tight loops and it was so effortless.

My feeling is the heavier the line the slower and more economical you go. I get it that it is probably better to be accelerating a lighter line but if the heavier setup works so well why not go with it? Having said that I know each cast is like starting over again and this is why I like to cast so much. I can change my mind as fast as each stroke that I make at this point in my learning curve.

Mostly I prefer the lighter side lines but with Nextcast heads I'm tending towards the slightly heavier side especially using sink tips. Tylers suggestions for the CND rods are great and are pretty light. Like most good casters I think he tends towards lighter for fishing. Tommy Aarkvisla is the CND guy in Norway and he seems to suggest one size heavier. How much does technique play into the best line for a rod? Tommy seems to have a very relaxed and economical stroke yet even in slow motion its hard to see his forward stoke it accelerates so fast. I have yet to watch Tyler closely.

I've taken to watching video of distance casting and those that seem to go the furthest seem to cast the easiest yet the rod flex is amazing. Skagit to mid and long belly technique is so very different yet so much the same. Watching the rod is probably the best advise! The more I try to do this the easier everything gets. Every head, sink tip and rod is slightly different.

What was counter intuitive to me at first is that the longer heads need more grain weight. My CND 14'2 likes about 550 grains for a Coastal, 650 grains for a WA45 and 700 to 800 grains for a WA70. I guess its because the weight is spread out over a longer length. I'm still struggling with the lighter side of a 70' head. I find a Carron 65' or the Vector XL easier to cast than the NC 70. It has been suggested to me that especially with the Gen 2 heads it takes a more exacting technique but when it is mastered the NC70 heads are darts. Any comments on this? Guess I just have to keep practicing
Call poppy at the Redshed and test drive a Gaelforce Equalizer 54 or 63
The trick with the lighter line is as mentioned.....being disciplined enough to watch the rod stay bent through the whole cast and this can only be done by being super slow and super smooth.....this is ment as an exercise and not necessarily for fishing

Bruce Kruk
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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 03-15-2017, 06:20 PM Thread Starter
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I'm still struggling with the lighter side of a 70' head. I find a Carron 65' or the Vector XL easier to cast than the NC 70. It has been suggested to me that especially with the Gen 2 heads it takes a more exacting technique but when it is mastered the NC70 heads are darts. Any comments on this? Guess I just have to keep practicing
Yes, keep practicing. The FF70 are sweet lines. Just keep practicing you will get it. But like Bruce states, the Galeforce are amazing lines.

... the pseudo-science of running-lines and matching heads has now devolved into such a miasma of obfuscation that it is a wonder that people are even not more confused....Erik Helm

www.linespeedjedi.com
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