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  #16  
Old 04-29-2012, 11:07 PM
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When we learn to Spey cast, the lift is usually an early lesson.

We are all taught (except Knut Systrand) to start our cast with a lift, with the rod tip at or near the surface of the water. (Knut is spectacularly different, ending his setup cast with the rod at about his sweep height and starting from there.)

Here was a problem with my casting I only recently recognized: I finish my distance cast with my bottom hand over on the top had side. This is proper technique for distance -- or at least everyone in the finals did it. This is true for my set up cast as well. (Not sure if that is best, but....) Problem is that The nicest transition from nice slow lift to either loop of the Snake or Sweep of the single spey is done with the rod held more or less across the body, with the bottom hand over on the bottom hand side and the top hand over on the top hand side, bending only at the elbows, slooooollly. Why was it that I was so slow to pick up that I had to MOVE my bottom hand over to the bottom hand side to get to this better position. I was doing my lift well when being coached on the lift and finishing my forward stroke well. I do not like my answer to: "How dumb can I be?"

The lift for distance casting is not really comparable to a trap shooter's shotgun lift, with the muzzle pointing to the target, but rather the rod is pointing at the dangle (set up cast). For the single spey the body moves to face the target early in the sweep. For the snake most started the lift already facing the target.

Whatever is done, all must be Slow, smooth, slack free.

Next time: Nemeses - Trunking, hooking, creep and overpowering. (No, they are not just for beginners.)
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  #17  
Old 04-30-2012, 10:12 AM
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Just as a side note, there is another Norwegian who doesn't start lift low. He doesn't much have a lift actually. The caster is Eirik Larsen. If interested, search in youtube with following words and you'll find my footage from 1,5 years back and you'll see: burud eirik
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  #18  
Old 04-30-2012, 02:26 PM
brent_e brent_e is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by locvetter View Post

There is scientific evidence that repeating pleasurable motions causes our central nervous system (CNS) to do something subsequent to performing the task. Perhaps hours later or during sleep, at a very different level of the brain than that which controlled the conscious performance, the CNS creates an ability to repeat the task more easily, at a more primitive neural level, sometimes at the level of the cerebelum or even the spinal cord. Think sex, satisfying hunger, or even defeating a threat, thus creating the feeling of security. No one really understands the brain science fully, but we can all accept that we tend to repeat activities that give us pleasure. We tend to learn and get better at things that feel good. Doing such good things on subsequent days further improves and reinforces. Pleasure facilitates creation of "muscle memory."
maybe this is why I'm making spey casts before I fall asleep???
thank you for an interesting thread, Loc.

Brent
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  #19  
Old 04-30-2012, 03:40 PM
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Hi Loc,

I've been following this thread as time allows me to get on here. You are definitely seeking a really good cast by the sounds of it. I am trying to get a little longer on the cast myself but am only solid at distances 65 - 100' or under if need be. Comfort is a real factor as you have said here. Once I found a lift - sweep - set and cast that is actually comfortable I stuck with it. That style perhaps is what keeps me from extending much beyond 100', when I push for more I lose that comfortable feeling and relaxed pace. Every now and then I mess up and the fly goes farther than I expected it would if I'm searching the water and that's a good feeling. Being a target water fisher I don't cast as often as some on here, I tend to pick my fights rather than look for them.

Still, this is interesting,

Ard
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  #20  
Old 05-01-2012, 09:09 PM
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Hi Loc,

I tend to pick my fights rather than look for them.



Ard
heh! Well put.
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  #21  
Old 05-02-2012, 11:15 PM
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Trunking, hooking, creep, and overpowering...
you have just defined my style Loc! LOL
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  #22  
Old 05-05-2012, 06:40 PM
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Great illustration of two things

Quote:
Originally Posted by sms View Post
Just as a side note, there is another Norwegian who doesn't start lift low. He doesn't much have a lift actually. The caster is Eirik Larsen. If interested, search in youtube with following words and you'll find my footage from 1,5 years back and you'll see: burud eirik
SMS,

Thanks for suggesting the YouTube of "Eirik Hernes Larsen, 17feet, 11 inches.300fps. 10/10/2009."

Not only does he start from a position that many get to with a lift, but the accellllerrratttttinggggg from so slow one checks to see if the pause was touched, to huge powerful speed, both in the sweep and the forward stroke. Best illustration!

It was Greg Bencivenga that pointed out my lack of smooth acceleration. It is tough to appreciate in real time. Greg does it superbly. I am proving it is difficult to learn.
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