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post #4 of (permalink) Old 01-15-2015, 08:22 AM
Tyke
''Speydo-masochist''
 
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Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: UK, Towy, Tweed, Dee, Deveron
Posts: 1,167
Quote:
Originally Posted by aviomech View Post
Its was a good read. And big rods can be fun to fish.

When I see the big rods aren't that tiring topic, I think of the movie line from The 13th Warrior: Antonio Banderas (holding a sword)"I can not lift this", viking response "Grow stronger".

My thoughts are this:

I don't go off conventional wisdom. I'm more of an experience type person.

I used to own a 15' St Croix Avid 10/11wt. I learned to cast it, and was one of my favorites, even more so than my Echo DH7130 13' 7wt. Truth be told, it was easier to cast. Then I learned to cast my Decco, line it properly, refined my technique, and learned that it wore me out less than my favored 15'. I started leaving the Avid at home, and the Decco was my favorite.

Now I own switch rods, and they are nice, less cumbersome rods, and when cast correctly, are even more of joy to fish.

I'm along the lines of, match the rod to the waters you fish. If I was fishing big wide rivers, a 14-15' rod with a longer belly, would be the ticket. Medium rivers, a 12'-13' rod is ideal. Small-medium rivers, my switches come out. Trout rods - 4-6wt, steelhead & coho - 6-7wt, Kings and big fish 8wt+.

Experience tells me I don't go after kings with an 11' 5wt or after trout with 15' 10wt. Experience also tells me an 11' 5wt is alot easier on the arms than a 15' 10/11.

On the other side of "Conventional wisdom" crowd, there is the"its worked for a 100 years" crowd.

Just because you can happily cast your 15' 8wt all day, doesn't mean you couldn't benefit from a lighter rod. It's like, I'm comfortable driving a full size diesel truck to work everyday, but could probably benefit from a smaller car with a better fuel economy and better suspension. (And easier to park!LOL)

So in short, my experience with many rods from 10'6" switch to 15' 10/11wt spey, is that all rods can be cast well, but a lighter rod is less fatiguing. And if the situation allows it, I will always lean to the lighter rod.


I agree with most of the above, the key point being to match the rod/ line weight outfit to the river. A shorter & lighter rod is easier to use as long as it will comfortably cover the water - but on a larger river having to push a shorter outfit to its' absolute limits to achieve adequate water coverage is more tiring than using a longer rod/ heavier line outfit at 80% capacity [i.e. a nice easy casting stroke] to achieve equal [or better] water coverage.

Add windy conditions & this difference is even greater, same with big heavy weighted flies etc.

There is no one size fits all; to use a golfing analogy you wouldn't play the whole course with a 6 iron - it's possible, but far from optimal.

Regards, Tyke.
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